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Search Results Returned:  22


Another Story or a Fisherman of the Inland Sea

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Sturgeon Award nominated novelette. It appeared in Tomorrow Speculative Fiction, August 1994. The story can also be found in the anthologies Timegates (1997), edited by Gardner Dozois and Jack Dann, The Best Time Travel Stories of the 20th Century (2004), edited by Harry Turtledove and Martin H. Greenberg, The James Tiptree Award Anthology 2 (2006), edited by Debbie Notkin, Pat Murphy, Karen Joy Fowler and Jeffrey D. Smith and The Time Traveler's Almanac (2014), edited by Jeff and Ann Vandermeer. It is included in the collection A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994).

Coming of Age in Karhide

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

This novelette originally appeared in the anthology New Legends (1995), edited by Greg Bear and Martin H. Greenberg. It can also be found in the anthologies Year's Best SF (1996), edited by David G. Hartwell, The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirteenth Annual Collection (1996), edited by Gardner Dozois, and Best of the Best: 20 Years of the Year's Best Science Fiction (2005), also edited by Dozois. It is included in the collections The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002) and The Hainish Novels & Stories (2017).

Mountain Ways

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Tiptree winning and Hugo nominated novelette in Le Guin's Hainish cycle. First publlished in Asimov's August 1996. Later collected in The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002). The story was reprinted in Clarkesworld Magazine, #90 March 2014.

Read the full story for free at Clarkesworld.

Solitude

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Nebula Award winning and Hugo Award nominated novelette in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. First published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction December 1994. Later collected in The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002) and Outer Space, Inner Lands (2012)

The Day Before the Revolution

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Nebula and Locus Award winning and Hugo nominated short story in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. Originally published in Galaxy Science Fiction August 1974. Collected in The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975).

The Matter of Seggri

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Tiptree Winning and Hug and Nebula nominated novelette in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. Originally published in Crank! #3, Spring 1994. Later anthologized in Gardner Dozois's The Year's Best Science Fiction, Twelfth Annual Collection (1995) and Flying Cups and Saucers: Gender Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy (1998), and collected in The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002) and Outer Space, Inner Lands (2012).

The Shobies' Story

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Nebula Award nominated novelette in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. It first appeared in Universe 1 (1990), edited by Karen Haber and Robert Silverberg. The story can also be found in the anthology The Space Opera Renaissance (2006), edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. The story is included in the collections A Fisherman of the Inland Sea (1994) and Outer Space, Inner Lands (2012)

Unchosen Love

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Tiptree nominated novelette in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. Originally published in Amazing Stories Fall 1994. Later anthologized in Gardner Dozois's Killing Me Softly: Erotic Tales of Unearthly Love (1995) and collected in The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002).

Vaster Than Empires and More Slow

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Hugo Awared nominated short story in Le Guin's Hainish setting. It originally appeared in the anthology New Dimensions 1 (1971), edited by Robert Silverberg. The story can also be found in the anthologies:

It is included in the collections The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975), Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences (1987) and The Wind's Twelve Quarters & The Compass Rose (2015).

Winter's King

Hainish Cycle

Ursula K. Le Guin

Hugo Award nominated short story in Le Guin's Hainish setting. It originally appeared in the anthology Orbit 5 (1969), edited by Damon Knight. The story can also be found in the anthology The Arbor House Treasury of Modern Science Fiction (1980), edited by Robert Silverberg and Martin H. Greenberg. It is included in the collections The Wind's Twelve Quarters (1975) and The Wind's Twelve Quarters & The Compass Rose (2015).

Rocannon's World

Hainish Cycle: Book 1

Ursula K. Le Guin

This debut novel from preeminent science-fiction writer Ursula LeGuin introduces her brilliant Hainish series, set in a galaxy seeded by the planet Hain with a variety of humanoid species, including that of Earth. Over the centuries, the Hainish colonies have evolved into physically and culturally unique peoples, joined by a League of All Worlds.

Earth-scientist Rocannon has been leading an ethnological survey on a remote world populated by three native races: the cavern-dwelling Gdemiar, the elvish Fiia, and the warrior clan, Liuar. But when the technologically primitive planet is suddenly invaded by a fleet of ships from the stars, rebels against the League of All Worlds, Rocannon is the only survey member left alive. Marooned among alien peoples, he leads the battle to free this newly discovered world and finds that legends grow around him as he fights.

Planet of Exile

Hainish Cycle: Book 2

Ursula K. Le Guin

The Earth colony of Landin has been stranded on Werel for ten years, and ten of Werel's years are over 600 terrestrial years, and the lonely and dwindling human settlement is beginning to feel the strain. Every winter, a season that lasts for 15 years, the Earthmen have neighbors: the humanoid hilfs, a nomadic people who only settle down for the cruel cold spell. The hilfs fear the Earthmen, whom they think of as witches and call the farborns. But hilfs and farborns have common enemies: the hordes of ravaging barbarians called gaals and eerie preying snow ghouls. Will they join forces or be annihilated?

City of Illusions

Hainish Cycle: Book 3

Ursula K. Le Guin

Falk was a fully grown man, alone in the dense forest, with no trail to show where he had come from and no memory to tell who - or what - he was.

The forest people took him in and raised him almost as a child, teaching him to speak, training him in forest lore, giving him all the knowledge they had.

But they could not solve the riddle of his past, and finally he had to set out on a perilous quest to Es Toch, the City of the Shing, the Liars of Earth, the Enemy of Mankind.

There he would find his true self - and a universe of danger....

The Left Hand of Darkness

Hainish Cycle: Book 4

Ursula K. Le Guin

Genly Ai is an ethnologist observing the people of the planet Gethen, a world perpetually in winter. The people there are androgynous, normally neuter, but they can become male ot female at the peak of their sexual cycle. They seem to Genly Ai alien, unsophisticated and confusing. But he is drawn into the complex politics of the planet and, during a long, tortuous journey across the ice with a politician who has fallen from favour and has been outcast, he loses his professional detachment and reaches a painful understanding of the true nature of Gethenians and, in a moving and memorable sequence, even finds love...

The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia

Hainish Cycle: Book 5

Ursula K. Le Guin

Shevek, a brilliant physicist, decides to take action. He will seek answers, question the unquestionable, and attempt to tear down the walls of hatred that have isolated his planet of anarchists from the rest of the civilized universe. To do this dangerous task will mean giving up his family and possibly his life. Shevek must make the unprecedented journey to the utopian mother planet, Urras, to challenge the complex structures of life and living, and ignite the fires of change.

The Word for World is Forest

Hainish Cycle: Book 6

Ursula K. Le Guin

The colonizing earthmen's persistent exploitation and abuse of the Athsheans' delicately balanced culture and ecology forebode extraterrestrial genocide or vengeful rebellion.

The Telling

Hainish Cycle: Book 8

Ursula K. Le Guin

Once a culturally rich world, the planet Aka has been utterly transformed by technology. But an official observer from Earth named Sutty has learned of a group of outcasts who live in the wilderness. They still believe in the ancient ways and still practice its lost religion-the Telling. Intrigued by their beliefs, Sutty joins them on a sacred pilgrimage into the mountains... and into the dangerous terrain of her own heart, mind, and soul.

Four Ways to Forgiveness

Hainish Cycle: Yeowe and Werel

Ursula K. Le Guin

At the far end of our universe, on the twin planets of Werel and Yeowe, all humankind is divided into "assets" and "owners," tradition and liberation are at war, and freedom takes many forms. Here is a society as complex and troubled as any on our world, peopled with unforgettable characters struggling to become fully human. For the disgraced revolutionary Abberkam, the callow "space brat" Solly, the haughty soldier Teyeo, and the Ekumen historian and Hainish exile Havzhiva, freedom and duty both begin in the heart, and success as well as failure has its costs.

In this stunning collection of four intimately interconnected novellas, Ursula K. Le Guin returns to the great themes that have made her one of America's most honored and respected authors.

Table of Contents:
• Betrayals • (1994) • novelette
Forgiveness Day • (1994) • novella
A Man of the People • (1995) • novella
A Woman's Liberation • (1995) • novella
• Notes on Werel and Yeowe • essay by Ursula K. Le Guin
• O Yeowe • poem

Forgiveness Day

Hainish Cycle: Yeowe and Werel: Book 2

Ursula K. Le Guin

Hugo, Nebula and Tipree Award nominated novella in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. Originally published in Asimov's November 1994. Later anthologized in Gardner Dozois The Year's Best Science Fiction, Twelfth Annual Collection (1995), Flying Cups and Saucers: Gender Explorations in Science Fiction and Fantasy (1998), and collected in Four Ways to Forgiveness (1995).

A Man of the People

Hainish Cycle: Yeowe and Werel: Book 3

Ursula K. Le Guin

Hugo Award nominated novella in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. Originally published in Asimov's April 1995. Later collected in Four Ways to Forgiveness (1995).

A Woman's Liberation

Hainish Cycle: Yeowe and Werel: Book 4

Ursula K. Le Guin

Hugo and Nebula Award nominated novella in Le Guin's Hainish Cycle. First published in Asimov's July 1995. Later anthologized in Gardner Dozois's The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirteenth Annual Collection and Willis & Williams' A Woman's Liberation: A Choice of Futures by and About Women (2001). Collected in Four Ways to Forgiveness (1995).

Old Music and the Slave Women

Hainish Cycle: Yeowe and Werel: Book 5

Ursula K. Le Guin

Locus nominated novella. It originally appeared in Far Horizons: The Great Worlds of Science Fiction (1999), edited by Robert Silverberg. The story is included in the collections The Birthday of the World and Other Stories (2002), The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin (2016), Hainish Novels & Stories, Volume Two (2017), and Five Ways to Forgiveness (2017).