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The Face of Another

Kobo Abe

Like an elegantly chilling postscript to The Metamorphosis, this classic of postwar Japanese literature describes a bizarre physical transformation that exposes the duplicities of an entire world. The narrator is a scientist hideously deformed in a laboratory accident–a man who has lost his face and, with it, his connection to other people. Even his wife is now repulsed by him.

His only entry back into the world is to create a mask so perfect as to be undetectable. But soon he finds that such a mask is more than a disguise: it is an alternate self–a self that is capable of anything. A remorseless meditation on nature, identity and the social contract, The Face of Another is an intellectual horror story of the highest order.

Kappa

Ryunosuke Akutagawa

The Kappa is a creature from Japanese folklore described as a scaly, child-sized being with a face like a tiger and a sharp, pointed beak. In the hands of Ryunosuke Akutagawa, one man's journey to Kappaland becomes the vehicle for a critique of Japanese life and customs in the tradition of Swift and Kafka. A perfectly formed gem from the pen of one of Japan's most important modern writers, this tale is at once a fable, a comedy, and a brilliant satire.

That Book Your Mad Ancestor Wrote

K. J. Bishop

Duellists in a decadent urban dream. Lost creatures in a bizarre post-apocalypse. Fables lingering into almost-modern worlds. From hallucinatory surrealism to human dramas at the fuzzy edges of reality, these stories and poems by the author of The Etched City are by turns exuberant, poignant, darkly funny and delightfully deranged, all showcasing the inventive magic of an acclaimed literary fantasist. Includes Aurealis Award winner The Heart of a Mouse and two stories in the world of The Etched City, one previously unpublished.

Night-Pieces

Thomas Burke

Perhaps no writer of the early 20th century had a better knowledge of London than Thomas Burke (1886-1945), and his collection Night-Pieces (1935) contains eighteen of his most haunting tales of that immense city's dark back alleys, shadowy courts, and mysterious houses. In Burke's London, anything might happen. You might turn round a corner and find yourself back in your childhood. A casual drink with a stranger might end with you - quite literally - losing your head. That pale, slightly sinister-looking man sitting across the restaurant might be a murdered corpse, returned from the dead. And those footsteps you hear following you as you walk along a foggy street, faintly lit by gaslight... well, let's just say you had better not look behind you...

A groundbreaking and undeservedly neglected volume, Night-Pieces contains a wide variety of weird and outré tales, ranging from stories of crime and murder to tales of ghosts, zombies, and the supernatural.

Contents:

  • Events at Wayless-Wagtail - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Father and Son - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Funspot - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Jack Wapping - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Johnson Looked Back - (1935) - short story
  • Miracle in Suburbia - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Murder Under the Crooked Spire - (1935) - shortfiction
  • One Hundred Pounds - (1935) - shortfiction
  • The Black Courtyard - (1935) - short story
  • The Gracious Ghosts - (1935) - shortfiction
  • The Hollow Man - (1933) - short story
  • The Horrible God - (1934) - short story
  • The Lonely Inn - (1935) - short story
  • The Man Who Lost His Head - (1935) - short story
  • The Watcher - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Two Gentlemen - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Uncle Exekiel's Long Sight - (1935) - shortfiction
  • Yesterday Street - (1935) - short story

The Hearing Trumpet

Leonora Carrington

Leonora Carrington (1917-2011), the distinguished British-born Surrealist painter who made her home in Mexico City, was also a writer of extraordinary imagination and charm, and The Hearing Trumpet is perhaps her best loved book. It tells the story of 92-year-old Marian Leatherby, who is given the gift of a hearing trumpet only to discover that her family has been plotting to have her committed to an institution. But this is an institution where the buildings are shaped like birthday cakes and igloos, where the Winking Abbess and the Queen Bee reign, and where the gateway to the underworld is wide open. It is also the scene of a mysterious murder. Occult twin to Alice in Wonderland, The Hearing Trumpet is a classic of fantastic literature that has been translated and celebrated throughout the world.

Fancies and Goodnights

John Collier

John Collier's edgy, sardonic tales are works of rare wit, curious insight, and scary implication. They stand out as one of the pinnacles in the critically neglected but perennially popular tradition of weird writing that includes E.T.A. Hoffmann and Charles Dickens as well as more recent masters like Jorge Luis Borges and Roald Dahl. With a cast of characters that ranges from man-eating flora to disgruntled devils and suburban salarymen (not that it's always easy to tell one from another), Collier's dazzling stories explore the implacable logic of lunacy, revealing a surreal landscape whose unstable surface is depth-charged with surprise.

Dadaoism: An Anthology

Quentin S. Crisp
Justin Isis

Dadaoism is the first anthology from Chômu Press. Editors Justin Isis and Quentin S. Crisp have selected twenty-six novellas, short stories and poems setting out an aesthetic manifesto of rich and stimulating prose style, explosively unhindered imagination and anarchic experimentation.

In their submissions guidelines, they challenged would-be contributors as follows: "We aspire to edit and compile an anthology that will be the literary and psychic equivalent of a tour around the edges of a dying galaxy in a spectacularly malfunctioning space vehicle." Please "take your protein pills and put your helmet on"; this is not easy reading. Expect views of some fantastic literary nebulae, and encounters with word-form singularities.

From Reggie Oliver's 'Portrait of a Chair', in which consciousness is explored from the point of view of furniture, to John Cairns' 'Instance', a nano-second by nano-second account of a high-speed telepathic conversation, to Julie Sokolow's 'The Lobster Kaleidoscope' in which naïve wordplay acts as a foundation for existentialist philosophy in a story of inter-species love; from those such as Michael Cisco, with growing followings, to unexpected new voices such as Katherine Khorey, Dadaoism presents a mystery tour of the literary imagination to demonstrate that outside of exhausted mainstream realism and uninspired genre tropes, contemporary English-language writing is thriving and creatively vital.

Contents:

  • 1 'Portrait of a Chair', by Reggie Oliver
  • 2 'Autumn Jewel', by Katherine Khorey
  • 3 'Visiting Maze', by Michael Cisco
  • 4 'The Houses Among the Trees', by Colin Insole
  • 5 'Affection 45′, by Brendan Connell
  • 6 'M-Funk Vs. Tha Futuregions of Inverse Funkativity', by Justin Isis
  • 7 'Spirit and Corpus', by Yarrow Paisley
  • 8 'Timelines', by Nina Allan
  • 9 'Jimmy Breaks up with His Imaginary Girlfriend', by Jimmy Grist
  • 10 'Body Poem', by Peter Gilbert
  • 11 'Testing Spark', by Daniel Mills
  • 12 'Noises', by Joe Simpson Walker
  • 13 'Romance, with Mice', by Sonia Orin Lyris
  • 14 'Grief (The Autobiography of a Tarantula)', by Jesse Kennedy
  • 15 'Orange Cuts', by Paul Jessup
  • 16 'Instance', by John Cairns
  • 17 'Kago Ai', by Ralph Doege
  • 18 'Fighting Back', by Rhys Hughes
  • 19 'Nowhere Room', by Kristine Ong Muslim
  • 20 'Koda Kumi', a Justin Isis re-mix of 'Italiannetto' by Quentin S. Crisp
  • 21 'The Lobster Kaleidoscope', by Julie Sokolow
  • 22 'The Eaten Boy', by Nick Jackson
  • 23 'Poppies', by Megan Lee Beals
  • 24 'Abra Raven', by D.F. Lewis
  • 25 'Pissing in Barbican Lake', by Jeremy Reed
  • 26 'Rock 'n' Roll Suicides', by Jeremy Reed

Children of Lovecraft

Ellen Datlow

Howard Phillips Lovecraft's stories shaped modern horror more than any other author's in the last two centuries: Cthulhu, the Old Ones, Herbert West: Reanimator, and more terrifying nightmares emerged from the mythos of this legendary writer.

Dark Horse teams up with Hugo and Bram Stoker award-winning editor Ellen Datlow to bring you this anthology of original prose stories that are "inspired" in theme and plot by Lovecraft's mythos. No pastiches and no stories in his style. Using variety in tone, setting, point of view, time, but no direct reference in the story to Lovecraft or his works. Featuring work by Richard Kadrey, Brian Hodge, A. C. Wise, Siobhan Carroll, Orrin Grey, and many more, with a stunning cover by Hellboy creator Mike Mignola.

Table of Contents:

  • Nesters by Siobhan Carroll
  • Little Ease by Gemma Files
  • Eternal Troutland by Stephen Graham Jones
  • The Supplement by John Langan
  • Mortensen's Muse by Orrin Grey
  • Oblivion Mode by Laird Barron
  • Mr. Doornail by Maria Dahvana Headley
  • The Secrets of Insects by Richard Kadrey
  • Excerpts for An Eschatology Quadrille by Caitlín R. Kiernan
  • Jules and Richard by David Nickle
  • Glasses by Brian Evenson
  • When the Stitches Come Undone by A.C. Wise
  • On These Blackened Shores of Time by Brian Hodge
  • Bright Crown of Joy by Livia Llewellyn

Dreams of Shreds and Tatters

Amanda Downum

When Liz Drake’s best friend vanishes, nothing can stop her nightmares. Driven by the certainty he needs her help, she crosses a continent to search for him. She finds Blake comatose in a Vancouver hospital, victim of a mysterious accident that claimed his lover’s life – in her dreams he drowns.

Blake’s new circle of artists and mystics draws her in, but all of them are lying or keeping dangerous secrets. Soon nightmare creatures stalk the waking city, and Liz can’t fight a dream from the daylight world: to rescue Blake she must brave the darkest depths of the Dreamlands.

Even the attempt could kill her, or leave her mind trapped or broken. And if she succeeds, she must face the monstrous Yellow King, whose slave Blake is on the verge of becoming forever.

The Wilds

Julia Elliott

"Julia Elliott's magical debut collection, The Wilds, brings together some of the most original, hilarious, and mind-bending stories written in the last two decades. She journeys deep into mythic terrains with an explorer's courage and a savant's wit, and the reports she sends back from imagination's hinterlands are charged with a vernacular that crackles with insight. Angela Carter, Kelly Link, and Karen Russell are similar visionaries in the short story form, but Elliott is very much her own irrepressible voice — and it's one well worth heeding. The Wilds is simply a milestone achievement."

— Bradford Morrow, author of The Uninnocent

Report to the Men's Club and Other Stories

Carol Emshwiller

What if the world ended on your birthday--and no one came? What if your grandmother was a superhero? Recommended to readers of Judy Budnitz, Geoff Ryman, Aimee Bender, and Grace Paley this fourth collection by the wonderful Carol Emshwiller includes the Nebula winning story "Creature."

Table of Contents:

  • Grandma - (2002) - shortstory
  • The Paganini of Jacob's Gully - (2002) - shortstory
  • Modillion - (1994) - shortstory
  • Mrs. Jones - (1993) - shortstory
  • Acceptance Speech - (1990) - shortstory
  • One Part of the Self Is Always Tall and Dark - (1977) - shortstory
  • Foster Mother - (2001) - shortstory
  • Creature - (2001) - shortstory
  • The Project - (2001) - shortstory
  • It Comes from Deep Inside - (2002) - shortstory
  • Prejudice and Pride - (2002) - shortstory
  • Report to the Men's Club - (2002) - shortstory
  • Overlooking - (2002) - shortstory
  • Water Master - (2002) - shortstory
  • Abominable - (1980) - shortstory
  • Desert Child - (2002) - shortstory
  • Venus Rising - (1992) - novelette
  • Nose - (2002) - shortstory
  • After All - (2002) - shortstory

Our Ecstatic Days

Steve Erickson

Our Ecstatic Days begins as the memoir of a young mother desperate to forget a single act, committed out of love and fear, that has changed forever the world around her.

In the waning days of summer, a lake appears, almost overnight, in the middle of Los Angeles. In an instant of either madness or revelation, convinced that the lake means to take her small son from her, Kristin becomes determined to stop it. Three thousand miles away, on the eve of a momentous event, another young woman - with a bond to Kristin that she can't even know - meets a mysterious figure who announces in the dark, "The Age of Chaos is here."

Against a forbidden landscape that shimmers with destiny and yearning, Our Ecstatic Days finally takes place on the terrain of a defiant heart. Human connections multiply into astonishing twists of fate - by which the wrongs of an obsolete century may be set right - and parallel lives spin faster toward the possibility that they will once again unite, electrifying a vision of the century to come.

The Sea Came In at Midnight

Steve Erickson

In the final seconds of the old millennium, 1,999 women and children march off the edge of a cliff in Northern California, urged on by a cult of silent men in white robes. Kristin was meant to be the two-thousandth to fall. But when at the last moment she flees, she exchanges one dark destiny for a future that will unravel the present.

Answering a cryptic personals ad for a woman "at the end of her rope," Kristin finds temporary haven in the Hollywood Hills with an older, unnamed man as obsessed as he is spiritually ravaged. In a locked room at the bottom of his house, he labors over his life's work: a massive blue calendar the size of a tsunami that measures modern time by the events of chaos and pinpoints the true beginning of the new millenium as not midnight December 31, 1999, but the early hours of one May morning in 1968. This calendar is shot through with the threads of other lives-those searching for a small measure of redemption and an answer to the question, "What's missing from the world?"

From a ritual sacrifice in the name of salvation to a ritual sacrifice in the name of pleasure, from an ancient haunted Celtic tower in Brittany to the revolving memory hotels of Tokyo, from a cinematic hoax in Manhattan that costs five women their lives to a mysterious bloodstained set of coordinates tacked to the wall of an abandoned San Francisco penthouse, The Sea Came at Midnight is a breathtaking literary dance of fate and coincidence. And, unknown even to her, at the center of that dance is the seventeen-year-old.

The Drowned Life

Jeffrey Ford

There is a town that brews a strange intoxicant from a rare fruit called the deathberry--and once a year a handful of citizens are selected to drink it....

There is a life lived beneath the water--among rotted buildings and bloated corpses--by those so overburdened by the world's demands that they simply give up and go under....

In this mesmerizing blend of the familiar and the fantastic, multiple award-winning New York Times notable author Jeffrey Ford creates true wonders and infuses the mundane with magic. In tales marked by his distinctive, dark imagery and fluid, exhilarating prose, he conjures up an annual gale that transforms the real into the impossible, invents a strange scribble that secretly unites a significant portion of society, and spins the myriad dreams of a restless astronaut and his alien lover. Bizarre, beautiful, unsettling, and sublime, The Drowned Life showcases the exceptional talents of one of contemporary fiction's most original artists.

Table of Contents:

  • The Drowned Life - (2007) - novelette
  • Ariadne's Mother - (2007) - short story
  • The Night Whiskey - (2006) - novelette
  • A Few Things About Ants - (2006) - short story
  • Under the Bottom of the Lake - (2007) - short story
  • Present from the Past - (2003) - novelette
  • The Manticore Spell - (2007) - short story
  • The Fat One - (2008) - short story
  • The Dismantled Invention of Fate - (2008) - novelette
  • What's Sure to Come - (2002) - short story
  • The Way He Does It - (2006) - short story
  • The Scribble Mind - (2005) - novelette
  • The Bedroom Light - (2007) - short story
  • In the House of Four Seasons - (2005) - short story
  • The Dreaming Wind - (2007) - short story
  • The Golden Dragon - (2008) - short story

The Empire of Ice Cream (collection)

Jeffrey Ford

Mixing the mundane with the metaphysical, the pairings of the everyday and the extraordinary in this collection of short fiction yield supernatural results--a young musician perceives another world while drinking coffee; a fairy chronicles his busy life in a sandcastle during the changing tide; a demonic 16th-century chess set shows up in a New Jersey bar; and Charon, the boatman of hell, takes a few days of vacation. Storylines both conventional and outlandish reveal humdrum routines as menacing and imaginary worlds as perfectly familiar. Allusions to authors such as Edgar Allan Poe and Jules Verne reinforce the fantasy tradition in these tales, while understated humor and moments of sadness add a quirky unpredictability. Each story is followed by a brief afterword that details its genesis, offering insight into the many autobiographical elements found within.

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction - (2006) - essay by Jonathan Carroll
  • The Annals of Eelin-Ok - (2004) - shortstory
  • The Annals of Eelin-Ok: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Jupiter's Skull - (2004) - shortstory
  • Jupiter's Skull: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • A Night in the Tropics - (2004) - shortstory
  • A Night in the Tropics: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • The Empire of Ice Cream - (2003) - novelette
  • The Empire of Ice Cream: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • The Beautiful Gelreesh - (2003) - shortstory
  • The Beautiful Gelreesh: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Boatman's Holiday - (2005) - shortstory
  • Boatman's Holidy: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Botch Town - (2006) - novella
  • Botch Town: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • A Man of Light - (2005) - shortstory
  • A Man of Light: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • The Green Word - (2002) - novelette
  • The Green Word: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Giant Land - (2004) - shortstory
  • Giant Land: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Coffins on the River - (2003) - novelette
  • Coffins on the River: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • Summer Afternoon - (2002) - shortstory
  • Summer Afternoon: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • The Weight of Words - (2002) - novelette
  • The Weight of Words: Story Notes - (2006) - essay
  • The Trentino Kid - (2003) - shortstory
  • The Trentino Kid: Story Notes - (2006) - essay

Suspended Heart

Heather Fowler

In an explosion of love's metaphors, Fowler's debut collection of stories, SUSPENDED HEART, takes on American fabulism with a cast of unexpected heroines in the narratives of life and loss: women whose hearts fall out at public malls, women whose bodies bloom with changing seasons, women who sprout blades or have multiple eyes, sleep as snakes, or birth saints like lapis lazuli babies. Where there is struggle and sadness, there is also humor: Fowler's fictive voice has been compared to both Franz Kafka and Donald Barthelme. There's a fearlessness to this prose, a melody of life and magic and loss.

Selected stories in this volume have been published online and in Australia.

Thunderer

Felix Gilman

In this breathtaking debut novel by Felix Gilman, one man embarks on a thrilling and treacherous quest for his people's lost god-in an elaborate Dickensian city that is either blessed... or haunted.

Arjun arrives in Ararat just as a magnificent winged creature swoops and sails over the city. For it is the day of the return of that long-awaited, unpredictable mystical creature: the great Bird. But does it come for good or ill? And in the service of what god? Whatever its purpose, for one inhabitant the Bird sparks a long-dormant idea: to map the mapless city and liberate its masses with the power of knowledge.

As the creature soars across the land, shifting topography, changing the course of the river, and redrawing the territories of the city's avian life, crowds cheer and guns salute in a mix of science and worship. Then comes the time for the Bird's power to be trapped-within the hull of a floating warship called Thunderer, an astounding and unprecedented weapon. The ship is now a living temple to the Bird, a gift to be used, allegedly, in the interests of all of Ararat.

Hurtled into this convulsing world is Arjun, an innocent who will unwittingly unleash a dark power beyond his imagining-and become entangled in a dangerous underground movement that will forever transform Ararat. As havoc overtakes the streets, Arjun dares to test the city's moving boundaries. In this city of gods, he has come to search among them, not to hide.

A tour de force of the imagination, and a brilliant tale of rebellion, Thunderer heralds the arrival of a truly gifted fantasy writer who has created a tale as rich, wondrous, and captivating as the world in which it is set.

The Dark Domain

Stefan Grabinski

Poland's strong Catholic faith engendered in its literature a lively awareness of the Devil and a love of the supernatural and the fantastic. These stories are explorations of the extreme in human behaviour, where the bizarre chills the spine, and few authors can match Grabinski's depiction of seething sexual frenzy. The Dark Domain will introduce to English readers one of Europe's most important authors of literary fantasy.

This is an original collection which is comprised of stories originally written in Polish and subsequently translated.

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction - essay by Miroslaw Lipinski
  • Fumes
  • The Motion Demon
  • The Area
  • A Tale of the Gravedigger
  • Szamota's Mistress
  • The Wandering Train
  • Strabismus
  • Vengeance of the Elementals
  • In the Compartment
  • Saturnin Sektor
  • The Glance
  • Afterword: The Area - A Contemporary Horror Story? - (1993) - essay by Madeleine Johnson

Museum of the Weird

Amelia Gray

A monogrammed cube appears in your town. Your landlord cheats you out of first place in the annual Christmas decorating contest. You need to learn how to love and care for your mate--a paring knife. These situations and more reveal the wondrous play and surreal humor that make up the stories in Amelia Gray's stunning collection of stories: Museum of the Weird.

Acerbic wit and luminous prose mark these shorts, while sickness and death lurk amidst the humor. Characters find their footing in these bizarre scenarios and manage to fall into redemption and rebirth. Museum of the Weird invites you into its hallways, then beguiles, bewitches, and reveals a writer who has discovered a manner of storytelling all her own.

New Cthulhu: The Recent Weird

Paula Guran

For more than eighty years H.P. Lovecraft has inspired writers of supernatural fiction, artists, musicians, filmmakers, and gaming. His themes of cosmic indifference, the utter insignificance of humankind, minds invaded by the alien, and the horrors of history - written with a pervasive atmosphere of unexplainable dread - today remain not only viable motifs, but are more relevant than ever as we explore the mysteries of a universe in which our planet is infinitesimal and climatic change is overwhelming it. In the first decade of the twenty-first century the best supernatural writers no longer imitate Lovecraft, but they are profoundly influenced by the genre and the mythos he created. NEW CTHULHU: THE RECENT WEIRD presents some of the best of this new Lovecraftian fiction - bizarre, subtle, atmospheric, metaphysical, psychological, filled with strange creatures and stranger characters - eldritch, unsettling, evocative, and darkly appealing.

The Blind Owl

Sadegh Hedayat

Considered the most important work of modern Iranian literature, The Blind Owl is a haunting tale of loss and spiritual degradation. Replete with potent symbolism and terrifying surrealistic imagery, Sadegh Hedayat's masterpice details a young man's despair after losing a mysterious lover. And as the author gradually drifts into frenzy and madness, the reader becomes caught in the sandstorm of Hedayat's bleak vision of the human condition. The Blind Owl, which has been translated into many foreign languages, has often been compared to the writing of Edgar Allan Poe.

Mr. Splitfoot

Samantha Hunt

A contemporary gothic from an author in the company of Kelly Link and Aimee Bender, Mr. Splitfoot tracks two women in two times as they march toward a mysterious reckoning.

Ruth and Nat are orphans, packed into a house full of abandoned children run by a religious fanatic. To entertain their siblings, they channel the dead. Decades later, Ruth's niece, Cora, finds herself accidentally pregnant. After years of absence, Aunt Ruth appears, mute and full of intention. She is on a mysterious mission, leading Cora on an odyssey across the entire state of New York on foot. Where is Ruth taking them? Where has she been? And who -- or what -- has she hidden in the woods at the end of the road?

In an ingeniously structured dual narrative, two separate timelines move toward the same point of crisis. Their merging will upend and reinvent the whole. A subversive ghost story that is carefully plotted and elegantly constructed, Mr. Splitfoot will set your heart racing and your brain churning. Mysteries abound, criminals roam free, utopian communities show their age, the mundane world intrudes on the supernatural and vice versa.

Leena Krohn: Collected Fiction

Leena Krohn

A celebration of a legendary Finnish author, with several novels, stories, and appreciations. For readers of Ursula K. Le Guin, Milan Kundera, Virginia Woolf, Tove Jansson, and Italo Calvino. Over 800 pages covering Leena Krohn's entire career.

"One of the most important books published in the U.S. this year. [Leena Krohn's Collected Fiction] is as important a publishing event in its own way as New Directions' release... of Clarice Lispector's Complete Stories." - The Mumpsimus "An extraordinary writer who deserves to be better known to readers in English?which, thanks to this excellent collection, is now possible. Reminiscent of Calvino, Borges, and Lem." - STARRED REVIEW, Kirkus

Translations by: Eva Buckwald, Bethany Fox, Hildi Hawkins, Anselm Hollo, Vivii Hyvönen, Leena Likitalo, Herbert Lomas, J. Robert Tupasela, and Anna Volmari. Nonfiction by Minna Jerrman, Desirina Boskovich, Matthew Cheney.

From cities of giant insects to a mysterious woman claiming to be the female Don Quixote, Leena Krohn's fiction has fascinated and intrigued readers for over forty years. Within these covers you will discover a pelican that can talk and a city of gold. You will find yourself exploring a future of intelligence both artificial and biotech, along with a mysterious plant that induces strange visions. Krohn writes eloquently, passionately, about the nature of reality, the nature of Nature, and what it means to be human. One of Finland's most iconic writers, translated into many languages, and winner of the prestigious Finlandia Prize, Krohn has had an incredibly distinguished career.

Collected Fiction provides readers with a rich, thick omnibus of the best of her work. This collection includes several previously unpublished English translations, foremost among them the novels Pereat Mundus and The Pelican's New Clothes. Other novels included are: Tainaron, Dona Quixote, Ophir City of Gold, and Datura.

Tainaron: Mail from Another City

Leena Krohn

TAINARON: Mail From Another City is the first American publication by the internationally acclaimed Finnish author, Leena Krohn. TAINARON consists of a series of letters sent beyond the sea from a city of insects. TAINARON is a book of changes. It speaks of metamorphoses that test all of nature from a flea to a star, from stone and grass to a human. The same irresistible force that gives us birth, also kills us. Nominated for the prestigious Finlandia prize, this is the perfect introduction to the work of a modern fabulist.

The Other Side

Alfred Kubin

The Other Side tells of a dream kingdom which becomes a nightmare, of a journey to Pearl, a mysterious city created deep in Asia, which is also a journey to the depths of the subconcious, or as Kubin himself called it, 'a sort of Baedeker for those lands which are half known to us'. Written in 1908, and more or less half way between Meyrink and Kafka, it was greeted with wild enthusiasm by the artists and writers of the Expressionist generation.

Expressionist illustrator Kubin wrote this fascinating curio, his only literary work in 1908. A town named Pearl, assembled and presided over by the aptly named Patera, is the setting for his hallucinatory vision of a society founded on instinct over reason. Culminating apocalyptically - plagues of insects, mountains of corpses and orgies in the street - it is worth reading for its dizzying surrealism alone. Though ostensibly a gothic macabre fantasy, it is tempting to read The Other Side as a satire on the reactionary, idealist utopianism evident in German thought in the early twentieth century, highly prescient in its gloom, given later developments. The language often suggests Nietsche. The inevitable collapse of Patera's creation is lent added horror by hindsight. Kubin's depiction of absurd bureaucracy is strongly reminiscent of Kafka's The Trial, and his flawed utopia, situated next to a settlement of supposed savages, brings to mind Huxley's Brave New World; it precedes both novels, and this superb new translation could demonstrate its influence on subsequent modern literature.

It will appeal to fans of Mervyn Peake and readers who like the darkly decadent, the fantastic and the grotesque in their reading.

Stories for the Nighttime and Some for the Day

Ben Loory

Loory's collection of wry and witty, dark and perilous contemporary fables is populated by people--and monsters and trees and jocular octopi--who are motivated by the same fears and desires that isolate and unite us all. In this singular universe, televisions talk (and sometimes sing), animals live in small apartments where their nephews visit from the sea, and men and women and boys and girls fall down wells and fly through space and find love on Ferris wheels. In a voice full of fable, myth, and dream, Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day draws us into a world of delightfully wicked recognitions, and introduces us to a writer of uncommon talent and imagination.

Contains the stories "The Man and the Moose" and "The Duck," as heard on NPR's This American Life; "The Book," as heard on Selected Shorts; and "The TV," as published in The New Yorker.

Three Scenarios in which Hana Sasaki Grows a Tail

Kelly Luce

Set in Japan, Luce's playful, tender stories--reminiscent of Haruki Murakami and Aimee Bender--tip into the fantastical, plumb the power of memory, and measure the human capacity to love. The award-winning narratives in this mesmerizing debut trace the lives of ex-pats, artists, and outsiders as they seek to find their place in the world. HANA SASAKI beguiles and surprises: stories include an oracular toaster, a woman who grows a tail, and a most unusual kind of sex reassignment.

Memoirs of a Porcupine

Alain Mabanckou

All human beings, says an African legend, have an animal double. Some doubles are benign, others wicked. This legend comes to life in Alain Mabanckou's outlandish, surreal, and charmingly nonchalantMemoirs of a Porcupine.

When Kibandi, a boy living in a Congolese village, reaches the age of 11, his father takes him out into the night and forces him to drink a vile liquid from a jar that has been hidden for years in the earth. This is his initiation. From now on, he and his double, a porcupine, become accomplices in murder. They attack neighbors, fellow villagers, and people who simply cross their path, for reasons so slight that it is virtually impossible to establish connection between the killings. As he grows older, Kibandi relies on his double to act out his grizzly compulsions, until one day even the porcupine balks and turns instead to literary confession.

The Hike

Drew Magary

From the author of The Postmortal, a fantasy saga unlike any you've read before, weaving elements of folk tales and video games into a riveting, unforgettable adventure of what a man will endure to return to his family...

When Ben, a suburban family man, takes a business trip to rural Pennsylvania, he decides to spend the afternoon before his dinner meeting on a short hike. Once he sets out into the woods behind his hotel, he quickly comes to realize that the path he has chosen cannot be given up easily. With no choice but to move forward, Ben finds himself falling deeper and deeper into a world of man-eating giants, bizarre demons, and colossal insects.

On a quest of epic, life-or-death proportions, Ben finds help comes in some of the most unexpected forms, including a profane crustacean and a variety of magical objects, tools, and potions. Desperate to return to his family, Ben is determined to track down the "Producer," the creator of the world in which he is being held hostage and the only one who can free him from the path.

At once bitingly funny and emotionally absorbing, Magary's novel is a remarkably unique addition to the contemporary fantasy genre, one that draws as easily from the world of classic folk tales as it does from video games. In The Hike, Magary takes readers on a daring odyssey away from our day-to-day grind and transports them into an enthralling world propelled by heart, imagination, and survival.

The Night Clock

Paul Meloy

"In the stories of Paul Meloy - where walk the living dead, genetically modified pandas, and the mad and terrible Nurse Melt, among others - raw, tell-it-like-it-is comedy brawls with trippy horror in a cage match for the human soul. Take a front row seat. Try not to get any blood on you" - Joe Hill

Phil Trevena's patients are dying and he needs answers. One of the disturbed men in his care tells him that he needs to find Daniel, that Daniel will be able to explain what is happening. But who is Daniel? Daniel was lost once, broken by the same force that has turned its hatred on Trevena. His destiny is greater than he could ever imagine.

Drawn together, Trevena and Daniel embark on an extraordinary journey of discovery, encountering The Firmament Surgeons in the Dark Time - the flux above our reality. Whoever controls Dark Time controls the minds of humanity. The Firmament Surgeons, aware of the approach of limitless hostility and darkness, are gathered to bring an end to the war that the Autoscopes, before they tear our reality apart...

The Night Clock is Paul Meloy's extraordinarily rich debut novel, introducing us to a world just beyond our own, shattering preconceptions about creativity and mental illness, and presenting us with a novel like no other.

"Paul Meloy has long been one of my favourite short fiction writers. When we first took on Solaris in 2009, he was one of first authors I approached about writing a novel for us. It's taken a few years but the wait has been well worth it. Meloy's stories are poetic, extraordinary and phantasmagoric, but, most importantly, they ring true. Paul's insights into mental health, the artistry of madness and the revelatory nature of the best genre fiction are what makes him one of most exciting writers working today." Jonathan Oliver, Solaris Editor-in-Chief

Dwellers in the Mirage

Abraham Merritt

Two men in one body! That's how Lief Langdon had always felt. One part of him was a modern day adventurer, the other was a strange half-memory of another life where he was a High Priest sacrificing living people to Khalk'ru, a demon god from another time and space. Then Langdon stumbled through the mirage into a hidden Arctic valley, where he fell under the spell of Evalie, as beautiful outwardly as she was inwardly, and her friends the Little People, elfin warriors constantly warring with Lur, the Witch-Woman, and her demon riders, who raided the Little People's land for sacrifices to their dark god, the Kraken. Horrified at the thought of their becoming sacrifices, Langdon took up the Little People's cause and wooed Evalie. But when he learned the Kraken was also known as Khalk'ru, memories of his past life -- as Lur's lover and High Priest of her sect came rushing back. Soon Langdon was fighting against his other self, a far stronger self that submerges him entirely and eagerly joins Lur, to rain kisses on her lips and wield the bloody knife of sacrifice on his own best friends!

The Ship of Ishtar

Abraham Merritt

Explorer John Kenton returns from a lifetime of wanderings and the wreckage of World War I to discover a mysterious block of Babylonian basalt containing a crystal model of an ancient ship - the Ship of Ishtar! The sultry magic of the fabled ship draws Kenton into its dreamworld, where a strange crew plucked from the ages sails in a lushly imagined mystical seascape. At the fore of the ship is Sharane, beautiful, proud, luxurious priestess instilled with the power of Ishtar, goddess of Love, Wrath, and Vengeance. On the prow broods inhuman Klaneth, infused with the essence of Negal, god of the Underworld. Kenton finds himself in a cosmic struggle of wills between them - sixty centuries in the making! Will he claim Sharane and take command of the Ship of Ishtar, or will its mysterious power take command of him?

The Last Days of New Paris

China Miéville

A thriller of war that never was--of survival in an impossible city--of surreal cataclysm. In The Last Days of New Paris, China Miéville entwines true historical events and people with his daring, uniquely imaginative brand of fiction, reconfiguring history and art into something new.

"Beauty will be convulsive...."

1941. In the chaos of wartime Marseille, American engineer--and occult disciple--Jack Parsons stumbles onto a clandestine anti-Nazi group, including Surrealist theorist André Breton. In the strange games of the dissident diplomats, exiled revolutionaries, and avant-garde artists, Parsons finds and channels hope. But what he unwittingly unleashes is the power of dreams and nightmares, changing the war and the world forever.

1950. A lone Surrealist fighter, Thibaut, walks a new, hallucinogenic Paris, where Nazis and the Resistance are trapped in unending conflict, and the streets are stalked by living images and texts--and by the forces of Hell. To escape the city, he must join forces with Sam, an American photographer intent on recording the ruins, and make common cause with a powerful, enigmatic figure of chance and rebellion: the exquisite corpse.

But Sam is being hunted. And new secrets will emerge that will test all their loyalties--to each other, to Paris old and new, and to reality itself.

This Census-Taker

China Miéville

Hugo Award nominated novella.

In a remote house on a hilltop, a lonely boy witnesses a traumatic event. He tries - and fails - to flee. Left alone with his increasingly deranged parent, he dreams of safety, of joining the other children in the town below, of escape.

When at last a stranger knocks at his door, the boy senses that his days of isolation might be over.

But by what authority does this man keep the meticulous records he carries? What is the purpose behind his questions? Is he friend? Enemy? Or something else altogether?

Filled with beauty, terror and strangeness, This Census-Taker is a poignant and riveting exploration of memory and identity.

The Opposite House

Helen Oyeyemi

Lyrical and intensely moving, The Opposite House explores the thin wall between myth and reality through the alternating tales of two young women. Growing up in London, Maja, a singer, always struggled to negotiate her Afro-Cuban background with her physical home. Yemaya is a Santeria emissary who lives in a mysterious somewherehouse with two doors: one opening to London, the other to Lagos. She is troubled by the ease with which her fellow emissaries have disguised themselves behind the personas of saints and by her inability to recognize them. Interweaving these two tales. Helen Oyeyemi, acclaimed author of The Icarus Girl, spins a dazzling tale about faith, identity, and self-discovery.

The Beautiful Bureaucrat

Helen Phillips

A young wife's new job in an enigmatic organization pits her against the unfeeling machinations of the universe in this inventive and compulsively page-turning first novel

In a windowless building in a remote part of town, the newly employed Josephine inputs an endless string of numbers into something known only as The Database. After a long period of joblessness, she's not inclined to question her fortune, but as the days inch by and the files stack up, Josephine feels increasingly anxious in her surroundings--the office's scarred pinkish walls take on a living quality, the drone of keyboards echoes eerily down the long halls. When one evening her husband Joseph disappears and then returns, offering no explanation as to his whereabouts, her creeping unease shifts decidedly to dread.

As other strange events build to a crescendo, the haunting truth about Josephine's work begins to take shape in her mind, even as something powerful is gathering its own form within her. She realizes that in order to save those she holds most dear, she must penetrate an institution whose tentacles seem to extend to every corner of the city and beyond. Both chilling and poignant, The Beautiful Bureaucrat is a novel of rare restraint and imagination. With it, Helen Phillips enters the company of Murakami, Bender, and Atwood as she twists the world we know and shows it back to us full of meaning and wonder--luminous and new.

At the Edge of Waking

Holly Phillips

With In the Palace of Repose, her debut collection of mostly unpublished work, Holly Phillips accomplished the improbable. The unknown Canadian author received critical acclaim and numerous honors including the 2006 Sunburst Award and nominations for the World Fantasy and Crawford Awards. Her accomplished prose sang with a unique voice, seamlessly blending emotion, insight, and craft.

Now, At the Edge of Waking presents her latest tales written with even more depth and range-including a new, never-published story. Portraying human reaction to dire change or extreme circumstance, combining the real intruded upon by the fantastic or the fantastic grounded in reality, Phillips describes the world as it is, as it may be, as something impossible yet entirely acceptable, enthralling the reader with her words.

Contents:

  • Introduction (At the Edge of Waking) - (2012) - essay by Peter S. Beagle
  • Brother of the Moon - (2007) - short story
  • Castle Rock - (2012) - short story
  • Cold Water Survival - (2009) - short story
  • Country Mothers' Sons - (2010) - short story
  • Gin - (2006) - short story
  • Proving the Rule - (2008) - novella
  • Queen of the Butterfly Kingdom - (2007) - short story
  • Story Notes (At the Edge of Waking) - (2012) - essay
  • The Long, Cold Goodbye - (2009) - novelette
  • The Rescue - (2010) - short story
  • Three Days of Rain - (2007) - short story
  • Virgin of the Sands - (2006) - short story

In the Palace of Repose

Holly Phillips

'The essential Holly Phillips story begins like this: In a world that felt too little, there lived a girl who saw too much.' - Sean Stewart

In the Palace of Repose is a collection of nine such stories, ranging from the delightfully fantastic 'In the Palace of Repose,' to the delicately horrific 'One of the Hungry Ones,' to the hauntingly literary 'The Other Grace.' Here indeed are young women, and young men, who have seen too much, and who have been abandoned to wrestle alone with the strange, the wonderful, the terrifying. Some triumph, some tragically fail. Most struggle on beyond the boundaries of their stories, carrying their wonders and horrors into their lives, into their worlds-worlds, and lives, startlingly like our own.

Contents:

  • 7 - Introduction (In the Palace of Repose) - (2005) - essay by Sean Stewart
  • 11 - In the Palace of Repose - (2004) - novelette
  • 37 - The Other Grace - (2005) - novelette
  • 63 - The New Ecology - (2002) - novelette
  • 84 - A Woman's Bones - (2005) - short story
  • 104 - Pen & Ink - (2005) - short story
  • 122 - One of the Hungry Ones - (2005) - novelette
  • 145 - By the Light of Tomorrow's Sun - (2005) - short story
  • 160 - Summer Ice - (2005) - short story
  • 179 - Variations on a Theme - (2005) - novelette

The Engine's Child

Holly Phillips

From acclaimed author Holly Phillips comes a major work of visionary fantasy in the vein of Jeff Vandermeer and China Miéville. As richly detailed as it is evocative, the vivid prose of this ambitious novel illuminates a lushly imagined world poised on the brink of revolution.

Lanterns and flickering bulbs light the shadowy world of the rasnan, the island at the edge of a world-spanning ocean that harbors, in its ivory towers and mossy temples, the descendants of men and women who long ago fled a world ruined by magical and technological excess. But not all the island's inhabitants are resigned to exile. A mysterious brotherhood seeks to pry open doors that lead back to their damaged, dangerous homeland. Others risk the even greater danger of flight, seeking new lands and new freedoms in the vast, uncharted sea.

Amid a web of conspiracy and betrayal, three people threaten to shatter this fragile world. Scheming Lord Ghar, faithful to lost gods and forbidden lore, plays an intricate power game; Lady Vashmarna, an iron-willed ruler, conceals a guilty secret behind her noble façade; and Moth, a poor, irreverent novice, holds perhaps the darkest power of all: a mysterious link to a shadowy force that may prove to be humanity's final hope–or its ultimate doom.

Gods, Men and Ghosts: The Best Supernatural Fiction of Lord Dunsany

Lord Dunsany

Irish writer Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, 18th Baron of Dunsany, ranks among the twentieth century's great masters of supernatural and science fiction. An outstanding dramatist whose supernatural plays anticipated the theater of the absurd, Dunsany was also a virtuoso writer of short stories and essays. This selection presents the finest of his works, gathered from long-out-of-print sources.

Contents include the famous "Three Sailors' Gambit," possibly the best chess story ever written; the remarkable trilogy about Nuth and the Gnoles, Thangobrind the Jeweller, and the Gibbelins; exploits of the Gods, including both "The Gods of Pengana" and adventures from other books; and favorite adventures of Jorkens, prince of liars. Dunsany's spellbinding tales are complemented by the remarkable visions of Sidney H. Sime, whose delicate illustrations form an indispensable complement to the stories.

In the Land of Time and Fantasy Tales

Lord Dunsany

In the Land of Time and Other Fantasy Tales is a posthumous collection of short stories by the writer Lord Dunsany, in the Penguin Classics series. Edited and with an introduction by S. T. Joshi, it assembles material from across Dunsany's long career. The cover illustration is a colourised version of a classic illustration for an early Dunsany story by his preferred artist, Sidney Sime.

The collection includes several of Dunsany's most famous stories. It is grouped in themed sections by the editor, and the contents are:

  • Introduction (S. T. Joshi)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (S.T. Joshi)
  • A Note on the Text (S. T. Joshi)
  • Section I: Pegana and Environs
    • The Gods of Pegana (entire text)
    • Time and the Gods ("The Lament of the Gods for Sardathrion")
    • The Legend of the Dawn
    • In the Land of Time
    • The Relenting of Sarnidac
    • The Fall of Babbulkund
  • Section II: Tales of Wonder
    • The Sword of Welleran
    • The Kith of the Elf-Folk
    • The Ghosts
    • The Fortress Unvanquishable Save for Sacnoth
    • Blagdaross
    • Idle Days on the Yann
    • A Shop in Go-by Street
    • The Avenger of Perdóndaris
    • The Bride of the Man-Horse
  • Section III: Prose Poems
    • Where the Tides Ebb and Flow
    • The Raft Builders
    • The Prayer of the Flowers
    • The Workman
    • Charon
    • Carcassonne
    • Roses
    • The City
  • Section IV: Fantasy and Reality
    • The Wonderful Window
    • The Coronation of Mr. Thomas Shap
    • The City on Mallington Moor
    • The Bureau d'Echange de Maux
    • The Exiles' Club
    • Thirteen at Table
    • The Last Dream of Bwona Khubla
  • Section V: Jorkens
    • The Tale of the Abu Laheeb (the first Jorkens story)
    • Our Distant Cousins
    • The Walk to Lingham
    • The Development of the Rillswood Estate
    • A Life's Work
  • Section VI: Some Late Tales
    • The Policeman's Prophecy
    • The Two Bottles of Relish
    • The Cut
    • Poseidon
    • Helping the Fairies
    • The Romance of His Life
    • The Pirate of the Round Pond
  • Explanatory Notes (S.T. Joshi)

Ratspeak

Sarah Porter

Ratspeak is the the shrill and sly language of the rats of New York City's subway. When a curious boy is granted his wish to speak and understand the secret language of the rats, he brings a curse upon his home. "Ratspeak" is a standalone story by the acclaimed author of Vassa in the Night (Tor Teen, September 2016).

Read the full story for free at Tor.com

Medusa's Web

Tim Powers

From the award-winning author of Hide Me Among the Graves, Last Call, Declare, and Three Days to Never, comes a phantasmagoric, thrilling, mind-bending tale of speculative fiction in which one man must uncover occult secrets of 1920s Hollywood to save his family.

In the wake of their Aunt Amity's suicide, Scott and Madeline Madden are summoned to Caveat, the eerie, decaying mansion in the Hollywood hills in which they were raised. But their decadent and reclusive cousins, the malicious wheelchair-bound Claimayne and his sister, Ariel, do not welcome Scott and Madeline's return to the childhood home they once shared. While Scott desperately wants to go back to their shabby South-of-Sunset lives, he cannot pry his sister away from this haunted "House of Usher in the Hollywood Hills" that is a conduit for the supernatural.

The Ant King and Other Stories

Benjamin Rosenbaum

"Rosenbaum's The Ant King and Other Stories contains invisible cities and playful deconstructions of the form. In "Biographical Notes to 'A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, With Air-Planes,' by Benjamin Rosenbaum"--yes, his name is part of the title--the author imagines a world whose technologies and philosophies differ wildly from ours. The result is a commentary on the state of the art that is itself the state of the art."

Table of Contents:

The Unfinished World and Other Stories

Amber Sparks

In the weird and wonderful tradition of Kelly Link and Karen Russell, Amber Sparks's dazzling new collection bursts forth with stories that render the apocalyptic and otherworldly hauntingly familiar. In "The Cemetery for Lost Faces," two orphans translate their grief into taxidermy, artfully arresting the passage of time. The anchoring novella, "The Unfinished World," unfurls a surprising love story between a free and adventurous young woman and a dashing filmmaker burdened by a mysterious family. Sparks's stories?populated with sculptors, librarians, astronauts, and warriors?form a veritable cabinet of curiosities. Mythical, bizarre, and deeply moving, The Unfinished World and Other Stories heralds the arrival of a major writer and illuminates the search for a brief encounter with the extraordinary.

Jagannath: Stories

Karin Tidbeck

"I have never read anything like Jagannath. Karin Tidbeck's imagination is recognizably Nordic, but otherwise unclassifiable -- quietly, intelligently, unutterably strange. And various. And ominous. And funny. And mysteriously tender. These are wonderful stories."--Ursula K. Le Guin

"Restrained and vivid, poised and strange, Tidbeck, with her impossible harmonies, is a vital voice."--China Mieville

Enter the strange and wonderful world of Swedish sensation Karin Tidbeck with this feast of darkly fantastical short stories. Whether through the falsified historical record of the uniquely weird Swedish creature known as the "Pyret" or the title story, "Jagannath," about a biological ark in the far future, Tidbeck's unique imagination will enthrall, amuse, and unsettle you. How else to describe a collection that includes "Cloudberry Jam," a story that opens with the line "I made you in a tin can"? Marvels, quirky character studies, and outright surreal monstrosities await you in the book widely praised by Michael Swanwick, Ursula K. Le Guin, China Mieville, and Karen Joy Fowler. Publishers Weekly calls it "brave... and brilliant." Locus Magazine says this is the most significant debut since the award-winning Margo Lanagan. Introduction by Elizabeth Hand, afterword by the author.

"Tidbeck has a gift for the uncanny and the unsettling. In these wonderful, subtle stories, magic arrives quietly. It comes from the forests or the earth or was always there in your own family or maybe exists in another realm entirely... leaving you slightly dazed and more than a little enchanted."--Karen Joy Fowler

"Were this collection to contain only its biomechanoid wonder of a title story, it would still be amazing. Jagannath heralds the arrival of a bold and brilliant new voice, which I see too few of these days. You must read Karin Tidbeck."--Caitlin R. Kiernan

"In Karin Tidbeck's collection Jagannath, the mundane becomes strange and the strange familiar with near-Hitchcockian subtlety. I loved Tidbeck's clean, classic prose. It creates beautifully eerie music for a twilight domain."--Karen Lord

"I can't think of when I last read a collection that blew me away the way that Jagannath has, or one that's left me somewhat at a loss to describe just how strange and beautiful and haunting these tales are."--Elizabeth Hand (from her introduction)

The New Weird

Jeff VanderMeer
Ann VanderMeer

Descend into shadowy cities, grotesque rituals, chaotic festivals, and deadly cults. Plunge into terrifying domains, where bodies are remade into surreal monstrosities, where the desperate rage against brutal tyrants. Where everything is lethal and no one is innocent, where Peake began and Lovecraft left off--this is where you will find the New Weird.

Edgy, urban fiction with a visceral immediacy, the New Weird has descended from classic fantasy and dime-store pulp novels, from horror and detective comics, from thrillers and noir. All grown-up, it emerges from the chrysalis of nostalgia as newly literate, shocking, and utterly innovative.

Here is the very best of the New Weird from some of its greatest practitioners. This canonic anthology collects the original online debates first defining the New Weird and critical writings from international editors, culminating in a ground-breaking round-robin piece, "Festival Lives," which features some of the hottest new names in New Weird fiction.

The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories

Jeff VanderMeer
Ann VanderMeer

From Lovecraft to Borges to Gaiman, a century of intrepid literary experimentation has created a corpus of dark and strange stories that transcend all known genre boundaries. Together these stories form The Weird, and its practitioners include some of the greatest names in twentieth and twenty-first century literature.

Exotic and esoteric, The Weird plunges you into dark domains and brings you face to face with surreal monstrosities. You won't find any elves or wizards here...but you will find the biggest, boldest, and downright most peculiar stories from the last hundred years bound together in the biggest Weird collection ever assembled.

The Weird features 110 stories by an all-star cast, from literary legends to international bestsellers to Booker Prize winners: including William Gibson, George R. R. Martin, Stephen King, Angela Carter, Kelly Link, Franz Kafka, China Miéville, Clive Barker, Haruki Murakami, M. R. James, Neil Gaiman, Mervyn Peake, and Michael Chabon.

Album Zutique

Jeff VanderMeer

Contents:

  • "A Guide to the Zoo" - Stepan Chapman
  • "The Beautiful Gelreesh" - Jeffrey Ford
  • "The Toes of the Sun" - Rhys Hughes
  • "My Stark Lady" - D.F. Lewis
  • "Python" - Ursula Pflug
  • "Free Time" - James Sallis
  • "The Scream" - Michael Cisco
  • "Dr. Black in Rome" - Brendan Connell
  • "Lights" - D.F. Lewis
  • "Mortal Love" - Elizabeth Hand
  • "A Dream of the Dead" - Steve Rasnic Tem
  • "A Hero for the Dark Towns" - Jay Lake
  • "The Catgirl Manifesto" - Christina Flook
  • "Eternal Horizon" - Rhys Hughes
  • "Maldoror Abroad" - K. J. Bishop

Veniss Underground

Jeff VanderMeer

In his debut novel, literary alchemist Jeff VanderMeer takes us on an unforgettable journey, a triumph of the imagination that reveals the magical and mysterious city of Veniss through three intertwined voices. First, Nicholas, a would-be Living Artist, seeks to escape his demons in the shadowy underground–but in doing so makes a deal with the devil himself. In her fevered search for him, his twin sister, Nicola, spins her own unusual and hypnotic tale as she discovers the hidden secrets of the city. And finally, haunted by Nicola’s sudden, mysterious disappearance and gripped by despair, Shadrach, Nicola’s lover, embarks on a mythic journey to the nightmarish levels deep beneath the surface of the city to bring his love back to light. There he will find wonders beyond imagining…and horrors greater than the heart can bear.

By turns beautiful, horrifying, delicate, and powerful, Veniss Underground explores the limits of love, memory, and obsession in a landscape that defies the boundaries of the imagination. This special edition includes the short stories “The Sea, Mendeho, and Moonlight”; “Detectives and Cadavers”; and “A Heart for Lucretia” and the novella Balzac’s War, offering a complete tour of the fantastic world of Veniss.

Meet Me in the Moon Room

Ray Vukcevich

Here are thirty-three weird, wonderful stories concerning men, women, teleportation, wind-up cats, and brown paper bags. By turns whimsical and unsettling -- frequently managing to be both -- these short fictions describe family relationships, bad breakups, and travel to outer space.

Vukcevich's loopy, fun-house mirror take on everyday life belongs to the same absurdist school of work as that of George Saunders, David Sedaris, Ken Kalfus, and Victor Pelevin.

The Moon King

Neil Williamson

All is not well in Glassholm. Life under the moon has always been so predictable: day follows night, wax phases to wane and, after the despair of every Darkday, a person's mood soars to euphoria at Full. So it has been for five hundred years, ever since the Lunane captured the moon and tethered it to the city.

Now, all that has changed. Amidst rumours of unsettling dreams and strange whispering children, society is disintegrating into unrest and violence. The very sea has turned against Glassholm and the island's luck monkeys have gone wild, distributing new fates to all and sundry. Turmoil is coming.

Three people find themselves at the eye of the storm: a former policeman investigating a series of macabre murders, an outsider artist embroiled in the murky intrigues of revolution, and a renegade engineer tasked with fixing the ancient machine at the city's heart. Each must fulfil their role or see Glassholm shaken apart, while all are subject to the machinations of their inscrutable and eternal monarch, The Moon King.

Diving Belles

Lucy Wood

In the tradition of Angela Carter, this luminous, spellbinding debut reinvents the stuff of myth.

Straying husbands lured into the sea by mermaids can be fetched back, for a fee. Trees can make wishes come true. Houses creak and keep a fretful watch on their inhabitants, straightening shower curtains and worrying about frayed carpets. A mother, who seems alone and lonely, may be rubbing sore muscles or holding the hands of her invisible lover as he touches her neck. Phantom hounds roam the moors and, on a windy beach, a boy and his grandmother beat back despair with an old white door.

In these stories, the line between the real and the imagined is blurred as Lucy Wood takes us to Cornwall's ancient coast, building on its rich storytelling history and recasting its myths in thoroughly contemporary ways. Calling forth the fantastic and fantastical, she mines these legends for that bit of magic remaining in all our lives--if only we can let ourselves see it.

Table of Contents:

  • Diving Belles
  • Countless Stones
  • Of Mothers and Little People
  • Lights in Other People's Houses
  • Magpies
  • The Giant's Boneyard
  • Beachcombing
  • Notes From the House Spirits
  • The Wishing Tree
  • Blue Moon
  • Wisht
  • Some Drolls Are Like That and Some Are Like This

Shriek: An Afterword

Ambergris: Book 2

Jeff VanderMeer

Narrated with flamboyant intensity by one-time society figure Janice Shriek, and presenting a vivid gallery of strange characters and even stranger events, this is an account of the adventures of her brother Duncan, a historian obsessed with a doomed love affair and a dark secret that may kill or transform him. It involves, too, a war between rival publishing houses which threatens to change Ambergris forever, and rivalry with a marginalised race known as the “grey caps” who, armed with advanced fungal technologies, wait underground for their chance to recover the city that was once theirs. This story of the family Shriek is an exotic and colourful novel of love, life and death which brings to fruition the author’s genius for capturing the truly weird.

Unwrapped Sky

Caeli-Amur: Book 1

Rjurik Davidson

A hundred years ago, the Minotaurs saved Caeli-Amur from conquest. Now, three very different people may hold the keys to the city's survival.

Once, it is said, gods used magic to create reality, with powers that defied explanation. But the magic--or science, if one believes those who try to master the dangers of thaumaturgy--now seems more like a dream. Industrial workers for House Technis, farmers for House Arbor, and fisher folk of House Marin eke out a living and hope for a better future. But the philosopher-assassin Kata plots a betrayal that will cost the lives of godlike Minotaurs; the ambitious bureaucrat Boris Autec rises through the ranks as his private life turns to ashes; and the idealistic seditionist Maximilian hatches a mad plot to unlock the vaunted secrets of the Great Library of Caeli-Enas, drowned in the fabled city at the bottom of the sea, its strangeness visible from the skies above.

In a novel of startling originality and riveting suspense, these three people, reflecting all the hopes and dreams of the ancient city, risk everything for a future that they can create only by throwing off the shackles of tradition and superstition, as their destinies collide at ground zero of a conflagration that will transform the world... or destroy it.

Unwrapped Sky is a stunningly original debut by Rjurik Davidson, a young master of the New Weird.

The Complete Pegana: All the Tales Pertaining to the Realm of Pegana

Call of Cthulhu: Book 5

Lord Dunsany

Contents:

  • vii - Introduction (The Complete Pegana) - (1998) - essay by S. T. Joshi
  • 1 - The Gods of Pegana - [Pegana] - (1905) - collection
  • 7 - The Gods of Pegana - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 8 - Of Skarl the Drummer - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 9 - Of the Making of the Worlds - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 11 - Of the Game of the Gods - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 13 - The Chaunt of the Gods - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 14 - The Sayings of Kib - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 15 - Concerning Sish - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 17 - The Sayings of Slid - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 20 - The Deeds of Mung - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 22 - The Chaunt of the Priests - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 23 - The Sayings of Limpang-Tung - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 25 - Of Yoharneth-Lahai - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 26 - Of Roon, the God of Going - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 30 - The Revolt of the Home Gods - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 33 - Of Dorozhand - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 35 - The Eye in the Waste - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 37 - Of the Thing That Is Neither God Nor Beast - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 40 - Yonath the Prophet - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 42 - Yug the Prophet - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 43 - Alhireth-Hotep the Prophet - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 44 - Kabok the Prophet - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 46 - Of the Calamity That Befel Yun-Ilara by the Sea - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 48 - Of How the Gods Whelmed Sidith - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 51 - Of How Imbaun Became High Prophet in Aradec - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 54 - Of How Imbaun Met Zodrak - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 57 - Pegana - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 60 - The Sayings of Imbaun - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 62 - Of How Imbaun Spake of Death to the King - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 63 - Of Ood - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 64 - The River - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 67 - The Bird of Doom and the End - [Pegana] - (1905) - shortstory
  • 69 - Time and the Gods - (1906) - collection
  • 73 - Time and the Gods - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 77 - The Coming of the Sea - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 82 - A Legend of the Dawn - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 89 - The Vengeance of Men - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 93 - When the Gods Slept - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 100 - The King That Was Not - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 103 - The Cave of Kai - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 109 - The Sorrow of Search - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 116 - The Men of Yarnith - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 123 - For the Honour of the Gods - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 127 - Night and Morning - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 130 - Usury - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 133 - Mlideen - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 135 - The Secret of the Gods - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 138 - The South Wind - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 141 - In the Land of Time - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 150 - The Relenting of Sarnidac - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 155 - The Jest of the Gods - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory
  • 156 - The Dreams of a Prophet - [Pegana] - (1906) - shortstory (variant of The Dreams of the Prophet)
  • 159 - The Journey of the King - [Pegana] - (1906) - novelette
  • 195 - Beyond the Fields We Know - [Pegana] - (1919) - essay
  • 199 - Idle Days on the Yann - [Beyond the Fields We Know - 1] - (1910) - shortstory
  • 217 - A Shop in Go-by Street - [Beyond the Fields We Know - 2] - (1912) - shortstory
  • 225 - The Avenger of Perdóndaris - [Beyond the Fields We Know - 3] - (1912) - shortstory

The Moon Pool

Early Classics of Science Fiction: Book 14

Abraham Merritt

Returning to New York following a botanical expedition to the South Seas, Dr. Walter T. Goodwin encounters an old friend who relates a strange story of an exotic island, a strange stone door, and a hypnotic, mysterious light, but when he investigates the tale, he discovers more than he had bargained for.

One of the most gripping fantasies ever written, The Moon Pool embodies all the romanticism and poetic nostalgia characteristic of A. Merritt's writings. Set on the island of Ponape, full of ruins from ancient civilizations, the novel chronicles the adventures of a party of explorers who discover a previously unknown underground world full of strange peoples and super-scientific wonders. From the depths of this world, the party unwittingly unleashes the Dweller, a monstrous terror that threatens the islands of the South Pacific.

Although Merritt did not invent the lost world novel, following in the footsteps of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Burroughs and others, he greatly elaborated upon that tradition. This new edition includes a biography of the author, and an introduction detailing Merritt's many sources and influences, including the occult, mythological, and scientific discourses of his day.

The Circus of Dr. Lao

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 20

Charles G. Finney

Abalone, Arizona, is a sleepy southwestern town whose chief concerns are boredom and surviving the Great Depression--that is, until the circus of Dr. Lao arrives and immensely and irrevocably changes the lives of everyone drawn to its tents.

Expecting a sideshow spectacle, the citizens of Abalone instead confront and learn profound lessons from the mythical made real--a chimera, a Medusa, a talking sphinx, a sea serpent, witches, the Hound of the Hedges, a werewolf, a mermaid, an ancient god, and the elusive, ever-changing Dr. Lao himself. The circus unfolds, spinning magical, dark strands that ensnare the town's populace: the sea serpent's tale shatters love's illusions; the fortune-teller's shocking pronouncements toll the tedium and secret dread of every person's life; sensual undercurrents pour forth for men and women alike; and the dead walk again.

Dazzling and macabre, literary and philosophical, The Circus of Dr. Lao has been acclaimed as a masterpiece of speculative fiction and influenced such writers as Ray Bradbury.

Rats and Gargoyles

Ratlords: Book 1

Mary Gentle

In a terraced city at the heart of the world, humans are mere underlings of the arrogant Rat-Lords. Men and women are confined to certain districts of the city, while the Rats are restricted to others by their own masters, the Decans. Incarnate in living rock, the thirty-six Lords of Heaven and Hell impose their divine will over Rats and humans alike through gargoyle acolytes, who in their hundreds of thousands wait to swoop down and devour any who oppose the god-daemons.

And opposition is growing.... For generations uncounted, human slaves were forced to build the mountainous Fane, but now the long-held dream of raising their own lost Temple has spurred the builders to revolt. Forbidden the knowledge to build for themselves, they plot to uncover the Masonic wisdom that has been lost for millennia - secrets that will free them from their rulers once and for all. But they need access to parts of the city denied them, and so they strike a deal with the Rat-Priest Plessiez, who has a grand scheme of his own.

Into this conspiracy step Prince Lucas of Candover, a student at the University of Crime, and no man's slave; Zari, a young Kadayan woman who is destined to become the living Memory of all that follows; and the White Crow, a woman whose powers are far greater than anyone suspects.

The Architecture of Desire

Ratlords: Book 2

Mary Gentle

Two powerful magicians -- the White Crow and her husband, Lord-Architect Casaubon -- become embroiled in a deadly conflict of politics and magic as the opposing forces of Queen Carola and Protector-General Olivia battle for control of seventeenth-century London.

City of Wonders

Seven Forges: Book 3

James A. Moore

Old Canhoon, the City of Wonders, is facing a population explosion as refugees from Tyrne and Roathes alike try to escape the Sa'ba Taalor. All along the border between the Blasted Lands and the Fellein Empire, armies clash and the most powerful empire in the world is pushed back toward the old Capital. From the far east, the Pilgrim gathers an army of the faithful, heading for Old Canhoon.

In Old Canhoon itself, the imperial family struggles against enemies old and new, as the agents of their enemies begin removing threats to the gods of the Seven Forges and prepare the way for the invading armies of the Seven Kings. In the distant Taalor valley, Andover Lashk continues his quest and must make a final decision, while at the Mounds, something inhuman is awakened and set free.

War is here. Blood will flow and bodies will burn.

Spirits of Flux & Anchor

Soul Rider: Book 1

Jack L. Chalker

Cassie did not feel the soul rider enter her body...but suddenly she knew that Anchor was corrupt, and that, far from being a formless void from which could issue only mutant changelings and evil wizards, Flux was the source of Anchor's very existence.

The price of her new knowledge is exile, yet Cassie and the Rider of her soul are the only hope for the redemption of both Flux and Anchor.

Empires of Flux & Anchor

Soul Rider: Book 2

Jack L. Chalker

Cassie did not feel the soul rider enter her body... but suddenly she knew that Anchor was corrupt, and that, far from being a formless void from which could issue ony mutant changelings and evil wizards, Flux was the soure of Anchor's very existence. The price of her new knowledge is exile, yet Cassie and the Rider of her soul are the only hope for the redemption of both Flux and Anchor.

Masters of Flux & Anchor

Soul Rider: Book 3

Jack L. Chalker

The Time of Danger Is at Hand

Mervyn, wizard and Fluxlord, leader of the Nine Who Guard, faces the ultimate threat of the opposing Seven Who Wait: the opening of the Hellgates to World. Closed more than 2,000 years ago, they are portals to unknowable danger and, perhaps, great power.

Mervyn must gather the shattered forces of guardianship, dispersed and reeling after the battle with Coydt: Cassie, once the powerful saint and crusader, now the brainwashed slave of an oppressive male dictatorship; Spirit, her daughter, controlled by her mysterious Soul Rider; Jeff, Spirit's son; Matson, he will lead the entire force of the Stringers Guild to war, if need be. But all of them are doomed to death unless they can become Masters of Flux & Anchor.

Area X: The Southern Reach Trilogy

Southern Reach Trilogy

Jeff VanderMeer

In time for the holidays, a single-volume hardcover edition that brings together the three volumes of the Southern Reach Trilogy, which were originally published as paperback originals in February, May, and September 2014.

Annihilation is the first volume in Jeff VanderMeer's Southern Reach trilogy, Authority is the second, and Acceptance is the third.

Area X-a remote and lush terrain-has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; all the members of the second expedition committed suicide; the third expedition died in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another; the members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within months of their return, all had died of aggressive cancer.

This is the twelfth expedition.

Their group is made up of four women: an anthropologist; a surveyor; a psychologist, the de facto leader; and our narrator, a biologist. Their mission is to map the terrain and collect specimens; to record all their observations, scientific and otherwise, of their surroundings and of one another; and, above all, to avoid being contaminated by Area X itself.

They arrive expecting the unexpected, and Area X delivers-they discover a massive topographic anomaly and life forms that surpass understanding-but it's the surprises that came across the border with them, and the secrets the expedition members are keeping from one another, that change everything.

After the disastrous twelfth expedition chronicled in Annihilation, the Southern Reach-the secret agency that monitors these expeditions-is in disarray. In Authority, John Rodriguez, aka "Control," is the team's newly appointed head. From a series of interrogations, a cache of hidden notes, and hours of profoundly troubling video footage, the secrets of Area X begin to reveal themselves-and what they expose pushes Control to confront disturbing truths about both himself and the agency he's promised to serve. And the consequences will spread much further than that.

It is winter in Area X in Acceptance. A new team embarks across the border on a mission to find a member of a previous expedition who may have been left behind. As they press deeper into the unknown-navigating new terrain and new challenges-the threat to the outside world becomes more daunting. The mysteries of Area X may have been solved, but their consequences and implications are no less profound-or terrifying.

Sleeping In Flame

The Answered Prayers Sextet: Book 2

Jonathan Carroll

Walker Easterling is a retired actor turned successful screenwriter living in the Vienna of strong coffee, fascinating friends, and mysterious cafes. When he falls in love with Maris York, a beautiful artist who creates cities, his life becomes alive in fantastic and unsettling ways. As Walker's love for Maris grows, his life gets more and more bizarre-he discovers he can see things happening just before they happen, and at the same time feels an incredibly strong tug from his past-so a friend steers him to Venasque, an odd little man reputed to be a powerful shaman. Venasque helps Walker discover and unravel his many interconnected past lives, and it is soon clear that an unresolved conflict from these past lives has resurfaced, and now threatens to undo Walker and Maris's love.

A Child Across the Sky

The Answered Prayers Sextet: Book 3

Jonathan Carroll

Weber Gregston and Philip Strayhorn are best friends. They were at college together; they struggle as nobodies in Hollywood together. Weber soon becomes the most acclaimed director of his generation. Phil is unrecognised for years, and then makes a series of notorious horror films. He has everything; love, fame, money.

Then he takes a gun and blows his head off. Why? Weber hopes the answer is on the video tapes that Phil has left him. But when he plays them, he finds messages from beyond the grave. Step by step, Weber learns that the evil Phil portrayed in his last film is not just slasher gore. He has created something which threatens his friends' lives. And if Weber doesn't put it right, and fast, that evil will extend far beyond a handful of people in Hollywood.

Exploring love and cruelty, creation and ambition, A Child Across the Sky is a brilliant tale of wonder and fear. It is also one of the most important novels of fantastic fiction in recent years.

Vellum

The Book of All Hours: Book 1

Hal Duncan

It's 2017 and angels and demons walk the earth. Once they were human; now they are unkin, transformed by the ancient machine-code language of reality itself. They seek The Book of All Hours, the mythical tome within which the blueprint for all reality is transcribed, which has been lost somewhere in the Vellum - the vast realm of eternity upon which our world is a mere scratch.

The Vellum, where the unkin are gathering for war.

The Vellum, where a fallen angel and a renegade devil are about to settle an age-old feud.

The Vellum, where the past, present, and future will collide with ancient worlds and myths.

And the Vellum will burn....

Trial of Flowers

The City Imperishable: Book 1

Jay Lake

The City Imperishable's secret master and heir to the long-vacant throne has vanished from a locked room, as politics have turned deadly in a bid to revive the city's long-vanished empire. The city's dwarfs, stunted from spending their childhoods in confining boxes, are restive. Bijaz the Dwarf, leader of the Sewn faction among the dwarfs, fights their persecution. Jason the Factor, friend and apprentice to the missing master, works to maintain stability in the absence of a guiding hand. Imago of Lockwood struggles to revive the office of Lord Mayor in a bid to turn the City Imperishable away from the path of destruction. These three must contend with one another as they race to resolve the threats to the city.

Madness of Flowers

The City Imperishable: Book 2

Jay Lake

The battle has been fought and won, and all have been transformed by the struggle. Imago of Lockwood has become Lord Mayor of the City Imperishable, though at a price beyond his wildest imagination. Bijaz the Dwarf has been imbued with a godlike power and a responsibility he scarcely understands. And Jason the Factor, resurrected from death at the hands of his sister, the Tokhari sandwalker Kalliope, has become the sula ma-jieni na-dia, the fabled Dead Man of Winter.

When a beautiful mountebank arrives in the City Imperishable, offering to lead an expedition to uncover the lost tomb of the Imperator Terminus, she stirs up the mob with promises of treasure and imperial power... but what will her quest unleash? Political intrigue, adventure, and all-out war await the principles and inhabitants of the City Imperishable. Through it all, the City may endure, but none will remain untouched by the Madness of Flowers...

The Vorrh

The Vorrh: Book 1

B. Catling

Prepare to lose yourself in the heady, mythical expanse of The Vorrh, a daring debut that Alan Moore has called "a phosphorescent masterpiece" and "the current century's first landmark work of fantasy."

Next to the colonial town of Essenwald sits the Vorrh, a vast--perhaps endless--forest. It is a place of demons and angels, of warriors and priests. Sentient and magical, the Vorrh bends time and wipes memory. Legend has it that the Garden of Eden still exists at its heart. Now, a renegade English soldier aims to be the first human to traverse its expanse. Armed with only a strange bow, he begins his journey, but some fear the consequences of his mission, and a native marksman has been chosen to stop him. Around them swirl a remarkable cast of characters, including a Cyclops raised by robots and a young girl with tragic curiosity, as well as historical figures, such as writer Raymond Roussel and photographer and Edward Muybridge. While fact and fictional blend, and the hunter will become the hunted, and everyone's fate hangs in the balance, under the will of the Vorrh.

Vigil

Verity Fassbinder: Book 1

Angela Slatter

Verity Fassbinder has her feet in two worlds.

The daughter of one human and one Weyrd parent, she has very little power herself, but does claim unusual strength - and the ability to walk between us and the other - as a couple of her talents. As such a rarity, she is charged with keeping the peace between both races, and ensuring the Weyrd remain hidden from us.

But now Sirens are dying, illegal wine made from the tears of human children is for sale - and in the hands of those Weyrd who hold with the old ways - and someone has released an unknown and terrifyingly destructive force on the streets of Brisbane.

And Verity must investigate - or risk ancient forces carving our world apart.