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The Mammoth Book of New Jules Verne Adventures: New Tales by the Heirs of Jules Verne

Eric Brown
Mike Ashley

Jules Verne, one of the founding fathers of science fiction, was the author of such thrilling and perennial favorites as Around the World in Eighty Days, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, as well as more than sixty other novels of adventure and exploration. One hundred years after his death, this magnificent new collection celebrates Verne's amazing vision. A host of today's top science fiction authors pay homage to Verne's genius with a series of stories inspired by his groundbreaking imagination and original characters.

In this anthology are extraordinary voyages of discovery and adventure from the four corners of the globe, and even within it. Following the tradition of Verne's original tales, Ian Watson tells of a journey deep into the center of the Earth, where Verne himself does battle with occultist Nazis, and Adam Roberts takes us to latter-day California, where a descendant of Verne's character Hector Servadac is preparing for the end of the world as we know it. These and many more compelling adventures add up to an anthology that will introduce a new generation to the wonder of Jules Verne and delight readers already familiar with the master.

Contents:

  • ix - Introduction: Return to the Centre of the Earth - (2005) - essay by Mike Ashley
  • 1 - A Drama on the Railway - (2005) - shortstory by Stephen Baxter
  • 15 - Jehan Thun's Quest - (2005) - novelette by Brian Stableford
  • 48 - Six Weeks in a Balloon - (2005) - shortstory by Eric Brown
  • 59 - Londre au XXIe Siècle - (2005) - shortstory by James Lovegrove
  • 74 - Giant Dwarfs - (2005) - novelette by Ian Watson
  • 99 - Cliff Rhodes and the Most Important Journey: A Land at the End of the Working Day Story - (2005) - novella by Peter Crowther
  • 144 - The True Story of Barbicane's Voyage - (2005) - novelette by Laurent Genefort (trans. of Le véritable voyage de Barbicane 1999)
  • 169 - Columbiad - (1996) - shortstory by Stephen Baxter
  • 184 - Tableaux - (2005) - novelette by F. Gwynplaine MacIntyre
  • 209 - The Secret of the Nautilus - (2005) - novelette by Michael Mallory
  • 230 - Doctor Bull's Intervention - (2005) - novelette by Keith Brooke
  • 257 - The Very First Affair - (2005) - novelette by Johan Heliot
  • 278 - Eighty Letters, Plus One - (2005) - shortstory by Kevin J. Anderson and Sarah A. Hoyt
  • 291 - The Adventurers' League - novelette by Justina Robson
  • 315 - Hector Servadac, fils - (2005) - novelette by Adam Roberts
  • 344 - The Mysterious Iowans - (2005) - novelette by Paul Di Filippo
  • 366 - Old Light - (2005) - shortstory by Tim Lebbon
  • 383 - The Selene Gardening Society - (2005) - shortstory by Molly Brown
  • 402 - A Matter of Mathematics - (2005) - novelette by Tony Ballantyne
  • 424 - The Secret of the Sahara - novelette by Richard A. Lupoff
  • 454 - The Golden Quest - (2005) - shortstory by Sharan Newman
  • 467 - The True Story of Wilhelm Storitz - (2005) - shortstory by Michel Pagel
  • 480 - The Shoal - (2005) - shortstory by Liz Williams

Lives of the Monster Dogs

Kirsten Bakis

A postmodern Mary Shelley, taking the parable of Frankenstein's monster several giant steps farther, might have written this fable of a novel about a tragic race of monster dogs--in this case, genetically and biomechanically engineered dogs (of several major breeds). Created by a German mad scientist in the 19th century, the monster dogs possess human intelligence, speak human language, have prosthetic humanlike hands and walk upright on hind legs. The dogs' descendants arrive in New York City in the year 2008, still acting like Victorian-era aristocrats. Most important, the monster dogs suffer humanlike frailties and, ultimately, real suffering more serious and affecting than the subject matter might at first glance suggest.

Chronopolis and Other Stories

J. G. Ballard

Sixteen of the author's own favorite science fiction stories.

Table of Contents:

  • The Voices of Time - (1960)
  • The Drowned Giant - (1964)
  • The Terminal Beach - (1964)
  • Manhole 69 - (1957)
  • Storm-Bird, Storm-Dreamer - (1966)
  • The Sound-Sweep - (1960)
  • Billenium - (1961)
  • Chronopolis - (1960)
  • Build-Up - (1957)
  • The Garden of Time - (1962)
  • End Game - (1964)
  • The Watch-Towers - (1962)
  • Now Wakes the Sea - (1963)
  • Zone of Terror - (1960)
  • The Cage of Sand - (1962)
  • Deep End - (1961)

Mr. Shivers

Robert Jackson Bennett

It is the time of the Great Depression.

Thousands have left their homes looking for a better life, a new life. But Marcus Connelly is not one of them. He searches for one thing, and one thing only. Revenge.

Because out there, riding the rails, stalking the camps, is the scarred vagrant who murdered Connelly's daughter. No one knows him, but everyone knows his name: Mr. Shivers.

In this extraordinary debut, Robert Jackson Bennett tells the story of an America haunted by murder and desperation. A world in which one man must face a dark truth and answer the question-how much is he willing to sacrifice for his satisfaction?

The Girl in the Road

Monica Byrne

In a world where global power has shifted east and revolution is brewing, two women embark on vastly different journeys--each harrowing and urgent and wholly unexpected.

When Meena finds snakebites on her chest, her worst fears are realized: someone is after her and she must flee India. As she plots her exit, she learns of The Trail, an energy-harvesting bridge spanning the Arabian Sea that has become a refuge for itinerant vagabonds and loners on the run. This is her salvation. Slipping out in the cover of night, with a knapsack full of supplies including a pozit GPS system, a scroll reader, and a sealable waterproof pod, she sets off for Ethiopia, the place of her birth.

Meanwhile, Mariama, a young girl in Africa, is forced to flee her home. She joins up with a caravan of misfits heading across the Sahara. She is taken in by Yemaya, a beautiful and enigmatic woman who becomes her protector and confidante. They are trying to reach Addis Abba, Ethiopia, a metropolis swirling with radical politics and rich culture. But Mariama will find a city far different than she ever expected--romantic, turbulent, and dangerous.

As one heads east and the other west, Meena and Mariama's fates are linked in ways that are mysterious and shocking to the core.

Written with stunning clarity, deep emotion, and a futuristic flair, The Girl in the Road is an artistic feat of the first order: vividly imagined, artfully told, and profoundly moving.

An Anglo-American Alliance: A Serio-Comic Romance and Forecast of the Future

Gregory Casparian

The novel is set in the future of 1960 and depicts a world that is geopolitically broadly similar to that of 1906, with Britain and the U.S. as the world's major colonial powers. The novel follows the romance of two young upper-class women, the Briton Aurora Cunningham and the American Margaret MacDonald, who attend the same ladies' seminary in Cornwall and pursue a secret romantic relationship.

Under the Skin

Michel Faber

Isserley picks up hitchhikers with big muscles. She, herself, is tiny-like a kid peering up over the steering wheel. She has a remarkable face and wears the thickest corrective lenses anyone has ever seen. Her posture is suggestive of some spinal problem. Her breasts are perfect; perhaps implants. She is strangely erotic yet somehow grotesque, vulnerable yet threatening. Her hitchhikers are a mixed bunch of men-trailer trash and travelling postgrads, thugs and philosophers. But Isserley is only interested in whether they have families and whether they have muscles. Then, it's only a question of how long she can endure her pain-physical and spiritual-and their conversation. Michel Faber's work has been described as a combination of Roald Dahl and Franz Kafka, as Somerset Maugham shacking up with Ian McEwan. At once humane and horrifying, Under the Skin takes us on a heart-thumping ride through dangerous territory-our own moral instincts and the boundaries of compassion. A grotesque and comical allegory announcing the arrival of an exciting talent, rich and assured.

Outland

Alan Dean Foster

In the distant future, a police marshal stationed at a remote mining colony on the Jupiter moon of Io uncovers a drug-smuggling conspiracy, and gets no help from the populace when he later finds himself marked for murder.

Marshal W.T. O'Niel is assigned to a mining colony on Io, one of Jupiter's moons. During his tenure miners are dying - usually violently. When the marshal investigates, he discovers the one thing all the deaths have in common is a lethal amphetamine-type drug, which allows the miners to work continuously for days at a time until they become "burned out" and expire. O'Niel follows the trail of the dealers, which leads to the man overseeing the colony. Now O'Niel must watch his back at every turn, as those who seek to protect their income begin targeting him...

Starman

Alan Dean Foster

An innocent alien from a distant planet learns what it means to be a man in love.

When his spacecraft is shot down over Wisconsin, Starman arrives at the remote cabin of a distraught young widow, Jenny Hayden, and clones the form of her dead husband. The alien convinces Jenny to drive him to Arizona, explaining that if he isn't, he'll die. Hot on their trail are government agents, intent on capturing the alien, dead or alive. En route, Starman demonstrates the power of universal love, while Jenny rediscovers her human feelings for passion.

The Thing

Alan Dean Foster

In the winter of 1982, a twelve-man research team at a remote Antarctic research station discovers an alien buried in the snow for over 100,000 years. Once unfrozen, the form-changing alien wreaks havoc, creates terror and becomes one of them.

Capricorn One

Ron Goulart

In order to protect the reputation of the American space program, a team of scientists stages a phony Mars landing. Willingly participating in the deception are a trio of well-meaning astronauts, who become liabilities when their space capsule is reported lost on re-entry. Now, with the help of a crusading reporter, they must battle a sinister conspiracy that will stop at nothing to keep the truth a secret.

Afterparty

Daryl Gregory

It begins in Toronto, in the years after the smart drug revolution. Any high school student with a chemjet and internet connection can download recipes and print drugs, or invent them. A seventeen-year-old street girl finds God through a new brain-altering drug called Numinous, used as a sacrament by a new Church that preys on the underclass. But she is arrested and put into detention, and without the drug, commits suicide.

Lyda Rose, another patient in that detention facility, has a dark secret: she was one of the original scientists who developed the drug. With the help of an ex-government agent and an imaginary, drug-induced doctor, Lyda sets out to find the other three survivors of the five who made the Numinous in a quest to set things right.

Guardian

Joe Haldeman

In 1879, Rosa Tolliver, a college-educated blueblood, marries a wealthy man who turns out to be a brute. She flees her Philadelphia mansion with her 14-year-old son, Daniel, and the two of them make their way to Dodge City, Kans. Rosa retrospectively describes the trip in incredible detail: the modes of transportation they took; the people they met; the books she read. With each carefully placed detail, Rosa weaves the tapestry of her life, and among the threads, she hints at a destiny: something extraordinary happens to her, and each book she reads, each decision she makes, in retrospect has something to do with this destiny. Her stay in Dodge City lasts only four years, and she and Daniel flee again when a Pinkerton detective tracks them down. Another well-documented trip-this time to the Alaska gold fields-follows. Toward the end, an Indian shaman, Raven, shows her alien wonders and a vision of a future Earth in which humanity's destiny is intertwined with her own.

Skin Folk

Nalo Hopkinson

A new collection of short stories from Hopkinson, including "Greedy Choke Puppy," which Africana.com called "a cleverly crafted West Indian story featuring the appearance of both the soucouyant (vampire) & lagahoo (werewolf)," "Ganger (Ball Lightning)," praised by the Washington Post Book World as written in "prose [that] is vivid & immediate," this collection reveals Hopkinson's breadth & accomplishments as a storyteller.

Three Years with the Rat

Jay Hosking

After several years of drifting between school and go-nowhere jobs, a young man is drawn back into the big city of his youth. The magnet is his beloved older sister, Grace: always smart and charismatic even when she was rebelling, and always his hero. Now she is a promising graduate student in psychophysics and the center of a group of friends who take "Little Brother" into their fold, where he finds camaraderie, romance, and even a decent job.

But it soon becomes clear that things are not well with Grace. Always acerbic, she now veers into sudden rages that are increasingly directed at her adoring boyfriend, John, who is also her fellow researcher. When Grace disappears, and John shortly thereafter, the narrator makes an astonishing discovery in their apartment: a box big enough to crawl inside, a lab rat, and a note that says This is the only way back for us. Soon he embarks on a mission to discover the truth, a pursuit that forces him to question time and space itself, and ultimately toward a perilous confrontation at the very limits of imagination.

This kinetic novel catapults the classic noir plot of a woman gone missing into the twenty-first-century city, where so-called reality crashes into speculative science. Jay Hosking's Three Years with the Rat is simultaneously a mind-twisting mystery that plays with the very nature of time and the story of a young man who must face the dangerously destructive forces we all carry within ourselves.

The Ogre Downstairs

Diana Wynne Jones

Casper, Johnny, and Gwinny are sure they'll never be happy again when their mother marries Jack, who is as mean as an ogre. To make matters worse, two obnoxious stepbrothers, Malcolm and Douglas, move in as well. No one -- except the parents -- seems happy. But when Jack gives a chemistry set to each group of kids, bigger problems take over. These are, it turns out, not your average chemicals. In one hilarious experiment after another, the kids discover they can fly, switch bodies with one another, and even disappear. If only they could figure out how to undo all of this! Are one combustible stepfamily and two explosive chemistry sets a formula for disaster?

The Mind Benders

James Kennaway

Why did Professor Sharpey, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist, commit suicide by throwing himself from a fast-moving train? And why were briefcases stuffed with cash found beside his shattered corpse? Major Hall of British Intelligence suspects Sharpey was a traitor selling secrets to the Communists. But Sharpey's colleague, Dr Harry Longman, believes his friend's strange behaviour is connected with his groundbreaking experiments using an isolation tank to test the effects of sensory deprivation. There's only one way for Longman to discover what really happened to Sharpey and clear his friend's name: he must subject himself to the same frightening experiments. But the terror he undergoes in the isolation tank is nothing compared to the horror that will follow: for what emerges from the lab is no longer Longman, but something else entirely...

E. T. the Extra-Terrestrial in His Adventure on Earth

William Kotzwinkle

Captivating audiences of all ages, this timeless story follows the unforgettable journey of a lost alien and the 10-year-old boy he befriends. Join Elliot, Gertie, and Michael as they come together to help E.T. find his way back home.

The Iron Heel

Jack London

Part science fiction, part dystopian fantasy, part radical socialist tract, Jack London's The Iron Heel offers a grim depiction of warfare between the classes in America and around the globe. Originally published nearly a hundred years ago, it anticipated many features of the past century, including the rise of fascism, the emergence of domestic terrorism, and the growth of centralized government surveillance and authority. What begins as a war of words ends in scenes of harrowing violence as the state oligarchy, known as "the Iron Heel," moves to crush all opposition to its power.

The Star Rover: A Tale of Past Lives

Jack London

The Star Rover is a novel by American writer Jack London published in 1915. In the United Kingdom it was published under the title, The Jacket.

A framing story is told in the first person by Darrell Standing, a university professor serving life imprisonment in San Quentin State Prison for murder. Prison officials try to break his spirit by means of a torture device called "the jacket," a canvas straight-jacket which can be tightly laced so as to compress the whole body. Standing discovers how to withstand the torture by entering a kind of trance state, in which he walks among the stars and experiences portions of past lives. The accounts of these past lives form the body of the work. They are in effect a series of powerfully written, but disconnected and unresolved, short stories.

The Summer Isles

Ian R. MacLeod

What would life in England look like in 1940 had the British lost World War I, replacing Germany 's role in history?

A powerfully gripping story of a closeted homosexual trying to survive in an alternate history England, Hugo finalist Ian R. MacLeod's novella The Summer Isles took readers by storm in 1998. First published in Asimov's Science Fiction, the novella explored what might happen had England become the equivalent of Nazi Germany. The novella went on to become a finalist for the 1999 Hugo Award and took home both the 1999 World Fantasy Award and the 1999 Sidewise Award for Alternate History, but has never been published in its original form... until now.

News from Nowhere: or, An Epoch of Rest

William Morris

News From Nowhere, one of the most significant English works on the theme of utopia, is the tale of William Guest, a Victorian who wakes one morning to find himself in the year 2102 and discovers a society that has changed beyond recognition into a pastoral paradise, in which all people live in blissful equality and contentment. A socialist masterpiece, News From Nowhere is a vision of a future free from capitalism, isolation and industrialisation.

The Time Traveler's Wife

Audrey Niffenegger

A dazzling novel in the most untraditional fashion, this is the remarkable story of Henry DeTamble, a dashing, adventuresome librarian who travels involuntarily through time, and Clare Abshire, an artist whose life takes a natural sequential course. Henry and Clare's passionate love affair endures across a sea of time and captures the two lovers in an impossibly romantic trap, and it is Audrey Niffenegger's cinematic storytelling that makes the novel's unconventional chronology so vibrantly triumphant.

An enchanting debut and a spellbinding tale of fate and belief in the bonds of love, The Time Traveler's Wife is destined to captivate readers for years to come.

Kidnapped into Space

Brenda Pearce

Worlds for the Grabbing

Brenda Pearce

A team of scientists travel the width and breadth of the solar system, solving scientific puzzles as they do.

Vanishing Point

Michaela Roessner

It happened one night, without warning: 90% of the human race disappeared without a trace. There were no bodies and no clue as to where they went or whether they would ever return. After years of violence spawned by fear and rage, an uneasy peace is restored. But fanatics still rove the land, trying to discover what caused the Vanishing.

Slum Online

Hiroshi Sakurazaka

CTRL + ALT + DEL YOUR LIFE

Etsuro Sakagami is a college freshman who simply drifts through life, but when he logs on to the combat MMO Versus Town, he becomes Tetsuo, a karate champ on his way to becoming the most powerful martial artist around. While his relationship with new classmate Fumiko goes nowhere, Etsuro spends his days and nights online in search of the invincible Ganker Jack. Drifting between the virtual and the real, will Etsuro ever be ready to face his most formidable opponent?

Frameshift

Robert J. Sawyer

Geneticist Pierre Tardivel may not have long to live-he's got a fifty-fifty chance of having the gene for Huntington's disease. But if his DNA is tragic, his girlfriend's is astonishing: Molly Bond has a mutation that gives her telepathy. Both of them have attracted the interest of Pierre's boss, Dr. Burian Klimus, a senior researcher in the Human Genome Project who just might be hiding a horrific past. Avi Meyer, a dogged Nazi hunter, thinks Klimus was the monstrous "Ivan the Terrible" of the Treblinka Death Camp.

As Pierre races against the ticking clock of his own DNA to make a world-changing scientific breakthrough, Avi also races against time to bring Klimus to justice before the last survivors of Treblinka pass away.

Replica

Lauren Oliver

Two girls, two stories, one epic novel.

From Lauren Oliver, New York Times best-selling author of Before I Fall and the Delirium trilogy, comes an epic, masterful novel that explores issues of individuality, identity, and humanity. Replica contains two narratives in one: Lyra's story and Gemma's story. The stories can be listened to separately, one after the other, or in alternating chapters. The two distinct parts of this astonishing novel combine to produce an unforgettable journey.

Lyra's story begins in the Haven Institute, a building tucked away on a private island off the coast of Florida that from a distance looks serene and even beautiful. But up close the locked doors, military guards, and biohazard suits tell a different story. In truth Haven is a clandestine research facility where thousands of replicas, or human models, are born, raised, and observed. When a surprise attack is launched on Haven, two of its young experimental subjects - Lyra, or 24, and the boy known only as 72 - manage to escape.

Gemma has been in and out of hospitals for as long as she can remember. A lonely teen, her life is circumscribed by home, school, and her best friend, April. But after she is nearly abducted by a stranger claiming to know her, Gemma starts to investigate her family's past and discovers her father's mysterious connection to the secretive Haven research facility. Hungry for answers, she travels to Florida, only to stumble upon two replicas and a completely new set of questions.

While the stories of Lyra and Gemma mirror each other, each contains breathtaking revelations critically important to the other story. Using a downloadable enhancement, listeners can decide how they would like to listen to the audiobook, as with the print version. They can listen to the story of Gemma or Lyra straight through first, followed by the other girl's story, or they can move between chapters in Lyra's and Gemma's sections. No matter how it is listened to, Replica is an ambitious, thought-provoking masterwork.

Tetrasomy Two

Oscar Rossiter

Would a truly intelligent person bother to interact with people?

Tetrasomy Two is the name for the extra chromosome pair that a young psychiatrist discovers in his vegetable patient. A patient that seems to have much more influence on his environment than one would expect from someone who hasn't spoken or moved for nearly 50 years. The search for answers is on, and now the doctor tries to walk the very fine line between sanity and madness in discovering the disturbing truth, which could imperil all of Earth.

The Abyss Surrounds Us

Emily Skrutskie

For Cassandra Leung, bossing around sea monsters is just the family business. She's been a Reckoner trainer-in-training ever since she could walk, raising the giant, genetically engineered beasts to defend ships as they cross the pirate-infested NeoPacific. But when the pirate queen Santa Elena swoops in on Cas's first solo mission and snatches her from the bloodstained decks, Cas's dream of being a full-time trainer seems dead in the water.

Waiting for her on the pirate ship is an unhatched Reckoner pup. Santa Elena wants to take back the seas with a monster of her own, and she needs a proper trainer to do it. She orders Cas to raise the pup and teach him to fight for the pirates. If Cas fails, her blood will be the next to paint the sea.

Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Steven Spielberg

Cable worker Roy Neary, who, along with several other stunned bystanders, experience a close encounter of the first kind - witnessing UFOs soaring across the sky. After this life-changing event, the inexplicable vision of a strange, mountain-like formation haunts him. He becomes obsessed with discovering what it represents, much to the dismay of his wife and family.

Meanwhile, bizarre occurrences are happening around the world. Government agents have close encounters of the second kind - discovering physical evidence of extraterrestrial visitors in the form of a lost fighter aircraft from World War II and a stranded military ship that disappeared decades earlier only to suddenly reappear in unusual places. Roy continues to chase his vision to a remote area where he and the agents follow the clues that have drawn them to reach a site where they will have a close encounter of the third kind - contact.

Battle Royale: Remastered

Koushun Takami

Koushun Takami's notorious high-octane thriller envisions a nightmare scenario: a class of junior high school students is taken to a deserted island where, as part of a ruthless authoritarian program, they are provided arms and forced to kill until only one survivor is left standing. Criticized as violent exploitation when first published in Japan--where it became a runaway best seller--Battle Royale is a Lord of the Flies for the 21st century, a potent allegory of what it means to be young and (barely) alive in a dog-eat-dog world.

Made into a controversial hit movie of the same name, Battle Royale is already a contemporary Japanese pulp classic, now available in a new English-language translation.

Mammoth

John Varley

Not content with investing his fortune and watching it grow, multibillionaire Howard Christian buys rare cars that he actually drives, acquires collectible toys that he actually plays with, and builds buildings that defy the imagination. But now his restless mind has turned to a new obsession: cloning a mammoth...

In a barren province of Canada, a mammoth hunter financed by Christian has made the discovery of a lifetime: an intact frozen woolly mammoth. But what he finds during the painstaking process of excavating the huge creature baffles the mind. Huddled next to the mammoth is the mummified body of a Stone Age man around 12,000 years old. And he is wearing a wristwatch.

It looks like Howard Christian is going to get his wish--and more...

The Best We Can

Carrie Vaughn

First contact was supposed to change the course of human history. But it turns out, you still have to go to work the next morning.

This story is anthologized in Gardner Dozois' The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirty-First Annual Collection (2014)

Read the full story for free at Tor.com.

In the Year 2889

Jules Verne
Michel Verne

"In the Year 2889," which was first published in 1889, portrays a futuristic day in the life of a 20th century newspaper editor. Much of the story sounds like an episode of "The Jetsons." For example, a man is clothed by a mechanical dresser before being whisked off to work. The story, which is set in New York City (now called Centropolis), delves into what the future world might look like, including technological advancements, international relations, and social mores.

First published n 1889 under the name of Jules Verne, "In the Year 2889" may be chiefly the work of Jules Verne's son, Michel Verne. Michel, who was in charge of publishing his father's work late in Jules Verne's life, may have had financial motivation to utilize his Jules Verne's well-known pen name. Regardless of actual authorship, many of the topics covered in "In the Year 2889" echo the ideas of Jules Verne, and the tenor of the book is generally in keeping with Jules Verne's optimistic view of future possibilities.

Has also appeared under the titles: In the Twentyninth Century: A Day in the Life of an American Jounalist in 2889 and In the 29th Century.

Paris in the Twentieth Century

Jules Verne

THE LITERARY DISCOVERY OF THE CENTURY

In 1863 Jules Verne, famed author of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and Around the World in Eighty Days, wrote a novel that his literary agent deemed too farfetched to be published. More than one hundred years later, his great-grandson found the handwritten, never-before published manuscript in a safe. That manuscript was Paris in the Twentieth Century, an astonishingly prophetic view into the future by one of the most renowned science fiction writers of all time...

The novel is set in Paris in 1960. Money and technology have taken over society and the narrator, a young poet, is forced to work in a bank. Verne's vision of our mechanized time is prescient: there are fax machines, automobiles, computers, subways, and electronic musical instruments.

Yesterday and Tomorrow

Jules Verne

Table of Contents:

  • Introduction (Yesterday and Tomorrow) - (1964) - essay by I. O. Evans
  • The Eternal Adam - (1957) - novelette by Jules Verne and Michel Verne (1910)
  • The Fate of Jean Morénas - (1964) - shortstory by Jules Verne and Michel Verne (1910)
  • An Ideal City - (1964) - shortstory by Jules Verne (1875)
  • Ten Hours Hunting - (1964) - shortstory by Jules Verne (1881)
  • Frritt-Flacc - (1959) - shortstory by Jules Verne (1884)
  • Gil Braltar - (1958) - shortstory by Jules Verne (1887)
  • In the Twentyninth Century: A Day in the Life of an American Journalist in 2889 - (1891) - shortstory by Jules Verne
  • Mr. Ray Sharp and Miss Me Flat - (1964) - shortstory by Jules Verne (1893)

The Rocket to the Moon

Thea von Harbou

Helius is an entrepreneur with an interest in space travel. He seeks out Professor Mannfeldt, a visionary who has written a treatise on the likelihood of finding gold on the moon, only to be ridiculed by his peers. Helius recognizes the value of Mannfeldt's work, but a gang of evil businessmen, intent on controling the world's gold reserves, have also taken an interest in Mannfeldt's theories.

Meanwhile, Helius's assistant Windegger has announced his engagement to Helius's other assistant, Friede. This is disconcerting to Helius, who secretly loves Friede, so he avoids their engagement party. He is mugged on the way home from his meeting with Mannfeldt by henchmen of the evil businessmen, commanded by an American, Walter Turner. They steal the research that Professor Mannfeldt had entrusted to him and also burgle Helius's home, taking other valuable material. They then present him with an ultimatum: they know he is planning a voyage to the moon; either he includes them in the project, or they will sabotage it and destroy his rocket. Reluctantly, Helius agrees to their terms.

The rocket team is assembled: Helius, Mannfeldt, Windegger, Friede and Turner, who represents the interests of the evil businessmen. After the rocket blasts off, they discover that Gustav, a young boy who has befriended Helius, is aboard as a stowaway with his collection of science fiction pulp magazines. During the journey, Windegger emerges as a coward, and the feelings of Helius toward Friede become known to her, creating a romantic triangle.

Once they get to the far side of the Moon, Mannfeldt and Turner prove Mannfeldt's theory that there is gold on the moon. They struggle in a cave, and Mannfeldt falls to his death in a crevasse. Turner attempts to hijack the rocket, and in the struggle, he is shot and killed. Gunfire damages the oxygen tanks, and they come to the grim realization that there is not enough oxygen for all to make the return trip. One person must remain on the moon, in it's breathable atmosphere on the far side.

Helius and Windegger draw straws to see who must stay and Windegger loses. Seeing Windegger's anguish, Helius decides to drug Windegger and Friede with a last drink together and take Windegger's place, letting Windegger return to Earth with Friede. Friede senses that something is in the wine. She pretends to drink and then retires to the compartment where her cot is located, closes and locks the door. Windegger drinks the wine, becoming sedated. Helius makes Gustav his confidant and the new pilot for the ship. Helius counts down the time for the ship's liftoff from a distance away. He watches it depart. He realizes that he is alone on the moon. As he lowers his head and resignedly starts to move towards the survival camp originally prepared for Windegger, Helius discovers that Friede has decided to stay with him on the moon. He throws his arms wide as Friede runs to him. They embrace.

Also published as The Girl in the Moon.

A Short History of the Future

W. Warren Wagar

In the tradition of H. G. Wells's The Shape of Things to Come, W. Warren Wagar's A Short History of the Future is a memoir of postmodern times. Cast in the form of a history book, the narrative voice of the book's powerful vision is that of a far-future historian, Peter Jensen, who leaves this account of the world from the 1990s to the opening of the twenty-third century as a gift to his granddaughter. A dazzling and imaginative combination of fiction and scholarship, Wagar's speculative history of the future alternates between descriptions of world events and intimate glimpses of his fictive historian's family through the ages.

Jensen's tale traces the flow of the future from the early twenty-first-century reign of a megacorporate global economy, to its sudden collapse in 2044, when nuclear catastrophe envelops the world. In the traumatic aftermath, a socialist world commonwealth comes into being in the year 2062, followed by a lengthy transition to a decentralized order of technologically mature autonomous societies, many located in outer space. The riveting literary interludes that follow each chapter take the form of letters and documents from the history of Jensen's family, evoking the everyday lives of people in the midst of these global-historical events. Here we meet a woman in Brazil whose son is dying from a new immuno-deficiency disease, two brothers comparing life on earth with life in a space colony, and many more.

Neither fiction nor nonfiction, Wagar's brilliantly creative work is not meant to forecast the future, but rather to draw attention to possibilities and alternatives for humankind and planet Earth. In doing so, it also serves as an unforgettable reminder that the future is being made now.

Infinite Jest: A Novel

David Foster Wallace

A gargantuan, mind-altering comedy about the pursuit of happiness in America. Set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring the most endearingly screwed-up family to come along in recent fiction, Infinite Jest explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to so dominate our lives; about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people; and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are.

Equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, Infinite Jest bends every rule of fiction without sacrificing for a moment its own entertainment value. It is an exuberant, uniquely American exploration of the passions that make us human - and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do.

If on a Winter's Night a Traveler

Xia Jia

A short story about a poet and her legacy, and how people handle it in the age of the internet and social media. Traslated by Ken Liu.

Read the full story for free at Clarkesworld.

Feed

M. T. Anderson

Identity crises, consumerism, and star-crossed teenage love in a futuristic society where people connect to the Internet via feeds implanted in their brains.

For Titus and his friends, it started out like any ordinary trip to the moon - a chance to party during spring break and play with some stupid low-grav at the Ricochet Lounge. But that was before the crazy hacker caused all their feeds to malfunction, sending them to the hospital to lie around with nothing inside their heads for days. And it was before Titus met Violet, a beautiful, brainy teenage girl who has decided to fight the feed and its omnipresent ability to categorize human thoughts and desires. Following in the footsteps of George Orwell, Anthony Burgess, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr., M. T. Anderson has created a not-so-brave new world — and a smart, savage satire that has captivated readers with its view of an imagined future that veers unnervingly close to the here and now.

Bring the Jubilee

Ward Moore

The United States never recovered from The War for Southern Independence. While the neighboring Confederacy enjoyed the prosperity of the victor, the U.S. struggled through poverty, violence, and a nationwide depression.

The Industrial Revolution never occurred here, and so, well into the 1950s, the nation remained one of horse-drawn wagons, gaslight, highwaymen, and secret armies. This was home for Hodgins McCormick Backmaker, whose sole desire was the pursuit of knowledge. This, he felt, would spirit him away from the squalor and violence.

Disastrously, Hodgins became embroiled in the clandestine schemes of the outlaw Grand Army, from which he fled in search of a haven. But he was to discover that no place could fully protect him from the world and its dangerous realities....

The Death of Grass

John Christopher

At first the virus wiping out grass and crops is of little concern to John Custance. It has decimated Asia, causing mass starvation and riots, but Europe is safe and a counter-virus is expected any day. Except, it turns out, the governments have been lying to their people. When the deadly disease hits Britain they are left alone, and society starts to descend into barbarism. As John and his family try to make it across country to the safety of his brotherÂ’s farm in a hidden valley, their humanity is tested to its very limits.

Published in the USA as: No Blade of Grass.

Accel World 1: Kuroyukihime's Return

Accel World: Book 1

Reki Kawahara

Prepare for a full dive!

Even in the future, all the advances and innovation in the world can't change the dynamics of the school playground. And for Haruyuki Arita, a fat kid in junior high, that means he's destined to always be at the bottom of the food chain, prime pickings for the school bullies. But when he is approached by Kuroyukihime, a beautiful and aloof upperclassman, Haruyuki's life is turned on its head as he dives into Brain Burst, a mysterious computer program, and the Accelerated World with her help. It's in the Accel World that Haruyuki casts off his depressing reality and takes hold of the chance to become a Burst Linker, a knight to protect his princess!

Accel World 2: The Red Storm Princess

Accel World: Book 2

Reki Kawahara

Since meeting Kuroyukihime, Haruyuki has managed to grow up a bit. But suddenly this mature Haruyuki is confronted by Tomoko, an elementary school girl he's never met before--who calls him "big brother"?! When Kuroyukihime sees the two of them flirting, the look she gives Haruyuki is like a cold knife stabbing him in the gut! Meanwhile, in the Accelerated World, something very mysterious is taking place...

A cursed piece of Enhanced Armament called the Armor of Catastrophe is making the rounds, polluting the minds of the duel avatars that don it and causing those avatars to attack at random with no regard for friend or foe. Only Silver Crow, the sole duel avatar with the power of flight, can apprehend the relic. Is Haruyuki up to the challenge on this mission to subjugate the Armor?!

Accel World 3: The Twilight Marauder

Accel World: Book 3

Reki Kawahara

Since meeting Kuroyukihime, the most beautiful girl in school, Haruyuki has grown up into a magnificent knight, fat and bullied though he might be. As the season turns to spring, a strange new student appears before Haruyuki and his friends, now in eighth grade. This mysterious seventh grader has mastered the art of using Brain Burst in everyday life, despite being curiously absent from the duel-matching list. With Kuroyukihime away on a field trip for the ninth grade class, this new member of the student body, in the guise of a warped duel avatar called Dusk Taker, steals "something precious" from Haruyuki with overwhelming force. Cast once again to the bottom rungs of the school-hierarchy ladder, Haruyuki is driven into a corner, and his only course of action is--?!

Accel World 4: Flight Towards a Blue Sky

Accel World: Book 4

Reki Kawahara

Prepare for a full dive!

Seiji Nomi is a mysterious new student whose skillful use of Brain Burst abilities in the real world has boosted him to astonishing heights of achievement (not to mention astonishing heights of jerkitude). When Haruyuki's wings are stolen by Seiji's cunning and ability, Haruyuki suffers a crushing defeat. Stripped of his greatest ability, will Haruyuki ever be able to rise again...?

Accel World 5: The Floating Starlight Bridge

Accel World: Book 5

Reki Kawahara

Seiji Nomi's scheming from his position atop the school social hierarchy has ceased. Sky Raker has returned to the Accelerated World, and upon joining Nega Nebulus, he and Kuroyukihime have become a force to be reckoned with. But one day, Haruyuki hears the news that the social camera network has been expanded to include the Hermes Cord space elevator, and he realizes what the next stage of the game will be: space. Upon arriving, he gets help from a mysterious operator in taking on the biggest mission in the history of Brain Burst! Plus, Kuroyukihime and Haruyuki have a chance to experience their first overnight event--except that Sky Raker and Fuko end up crashing it!

Accel World 6: Shrine Maiden of the Sacred Fire

Accel World: Book 6

Reki Kawahara

The silver wings responsible for the rise of Nega Nebulus, the legion led by Kuroyukihime, are weakening! During the battle with the mysterious Acceleration Research Society, Haruyuki sustained corrosion damage from the revived Chrome Disaster, and he has still been unable to escape its effects. The Seven Kings of Pure Color take this very seriously, and soon they hand down their judgement: purification. Now Haruyuki is faced with a choice--undergo the grueling purification process, or have a bounty on his head and risk being cast out of the Accelerated World altogether!

Accel World 7: Armor of Catastrophe

Accel World: Book 7

Reki Kawahara

In order to cleanse Silver Crow (aka Haruyuki), Kuroyukihime and the rest of Nega Nebulus launch an operation to rescue Ardor Maiden. In the midst of this dangerous mission, Silver Crow manages to make contact with Ardor Maiden, but in doing so, he invades the forbidden territory of the Imperial Palace. There he has a vision of Chrome Falcon and Saffron Blossom--but what do they have to do with Haruyuki?!

Accel World 8: The Binary Stars of Destiny

Accel World: Book 8

Reki Kawahara

Haruyuki's desperate battle with his friend Takumu has taken him to the brink, and he finally activates the Destiny, a purified version of the notorious Armor of Catastrophe. It's light versus dark as their fierce fight continues, and the stakes couldn't be higher. If Haruyuki can't rid his friend of the sinister ISS kit that's infected him, Takumu could be lost to the darkness forever. And he just might take Haruyuki with him...

Accel World 9: The Seven-Thousand-Year Prayer

Accel World: Book 9

Reki Kawahara

"I will never forgive you. I will kill you. I will continue to kill you until all your Burst Points are gone and you vanish from the accelerated world."

Having turned into Chrome Disaster once more, Haruyuki slaughters with the force of a vengeful god the avatars who made Ash Roller suffer. And then he fuses completely with the Armor of Catastrophe, down to his deepest depths. Silver Crow soars above the accelerated world, seeking out enemies to destroy. For his next target, he turns the spearhead of his hatred toward the creators of the ISS kit, the Acceleration Research Society.

A berserker no one can control. Before this raging figure, a long avatar stands to block his way. His name: Green Grandé. The absolute defense of the Green King, bearer of the most powerful shield, the Strife, collides fiercely with the madness of the cursed avatar! The conclusion to the Armor of Catastrophe arc!

Accel World 10: Elements

Accel World: Book 10

Reki Kawahara

"The Sound of Water on a Distant Day"

2046. Haruyuki, a.k.a Silver Crow, member of the reborn Nega Nebulus, makes a certain blunder and sees a sudden, precipitous drop in Burst Points. Given that he is backed up against the wall, Takumu suggests he hire an Accelerated World "bouncer."

Spring 2047. Haruyuki is plunged into an unprecedented crisis due to the machinations of new student Seiji Nomi. At the same time in Okinawa on a school trip, Kuroyukihime is set up for a "duel" by a strange Burst Linker.

Echo

Alex Benedict: Book 5

Jack McDevitt

A new novel of the fantastic unknown by the national bestselling author of Time Travelers Never Die.

Eccentric Sunset Tuttle spent his life searching in vain for forms of alien life. Thirty years after his death, a stone tablet inscribed with cryptic, indecipherable symbols is found in the possession of Tuttle's onetime lover, and antiquities dealer Alex Benedict is anxious to discover what secret the tablet holds. It could be proof that Tuttle had found what he was looking for. To find out, Benedict and his assistant embark on their own voyage of discovery-one that will lead them directly into the path of a very determined assassin who doesn't want those secrets revealed.

Alien Nation

Alien Nation

Alan Dean Foster

The time--a future closer than we know. Where groups of extraterrestrial aliens have become familiar members of our society.

The place--Los Angeles. Still a town of fast times and hard crime, touching every life form inside the city limits.

The cops--Sykes, earthman, and Francisco, alien. Facing a menace meaner than the meanest streets on their beat. Fighting an enemy as terrifying as the darkest forces in a vast, unfathomable universe. Battling back with the best--and the deadliest--of both their worlds.

Brontomek!

Amorphs Universe: Book 3

Michael G. Coney

The planet of Arcadia was on the verge of economic collapse -- its human colony decimated by the Relay Effect. More and more colonists leaving for other worlds. Then the Hetherington Organisation came up with an offer the Arcadians couldn't refuse -- a five-year plan to transform the planet into a new prosperity.

The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror

Angel of the Revolution: Book 1

George Griffith

A lurid mix of Jules Verne's futuristic air warfare fantasies, the utopian visions of News from Nowhere and the future war invasion literature of Chesney and his imitators, it told the tale of a group of terrorists who conquer the world through airship warfare. Led by a crippled, brilliant Russian Jew and his daughter, the 'angel' Natasha, 'The Brotherhood of Freedom' establish a 'pax aeronautica' over the earth after a young inventor masters the technology of flight in 1903. The hero falls in love with Natasha and joins in her war against society in general and the Russian Czar in particular.

Olga Romanoff: Or, The Syren of the Skies

Angel of the Revolution: Book 2

George Griffith

The novel is a sequal to The Angel of the Revolution, the tale of a worldwide brotherhood of anarchists fighting the world, armed with fantastical airships. The ending is on an apocalyptic note when a comet smashes into the earth.

Around the Moon

Baltimore Gun Club: Book 2

Jules Verne

After being fired out of the giant Columbiad space gun, the bullet-shaped projectile along with its three passengers, Barbicane, Nicholl and Michel Ardan, begins the five-day trip to the moon.

The Purchase of the North Pole

Baltimore Gun Club: Book 3

Jules Verne

"The Purchase Of The North Pole" is the sequel to "From the Earth to the Moon", set twenty years later.

Some members of the Baltimore Gun Club have purchased large tracts of land around the North Pole, but for what reason? Their plan is shortly thereafter revealed to the world: using the same mechanics of their cannon which propelled them on their Moon Journey, these members of the Baltimore Gun Club planned to tilt the Earth's axis in order to establish a more stable climate for the world. Can their grandoise plan succeed?

Also published as Topsy-Turvy.

Rolltown

Bat Hardin: Book 3

Mack Reynolds

Reynolds has turned his productive imagination towards the growing phenomenon of mobile living in America. Taking us decades into the future, he tells the story of a world where people have taken to the road EN MASSE, in huge mobile 'towns' composed of hundreds, or even thousands of inhabitants, attempting to deal with a hostile and over organized world.

Lumen

Early Classics of Science Fiction: Book 5

Camille Flammarion

Lumen was first published by Camille Flammarion (1842-1925) in 1872 as part of the Stories of Infinity collection. Flammarion was a well-known French astronomer, writer and highly successful popularizer of science during the late 19th century.

This famous novel, written in the form of a philosophical dialogue, features a cosmic spirit named Lumen who reveals the scientific wonders of the celestial universe to Quaerens, a young seeker of knowledge. Within its pages, the author mixes empirical observations about the nature and speed of light with vivid speculations about such diverse subjects as reincarnation, time travel, the reversibility of history and the ecospheres of alien planets. Lumen is one of the first science fiction novels to include detailed descriptions of alien life forms and the first to imagine (30 years before Einstein's theory of relativity) the differences in perception that might result from traveling at velocities close to and beyond the speed of light.

This Wesleyan edition is the first English translation of the original French text in over a hundred years. The volume includes notes, appendices and a critical introduction.

Subterranean Worlds: A Critical Anthology

Early Classics of Science Fiction: Book 17

Peter Fitting

The bizarre idea that the earth's interior is hollow and, perhaps, even populated has been put to effective literary use by writers ranging from Edgar Allen Poe and Jules Verne to Rudy Rucker and Edgar Rice Burroughs. This notion had respectability as a scientific hypothesis until the early 1800s, and the theory that the earth "is hollow and inhabitable within" continues to find believers as an alternative description of the earth to this day.

The hollow earth is one of the most important settings in the literature of the imagination that fed into early science fiction. Subterranean Worlds presents a fascinating look at the theme of the hollow earth and its history, as well as the geological theories which produced many of these stories. It excerpts key passages from the major subterranean world fictions, some translated into English for the first time. With helpful introductions to each selection and a comprehensive bibliography, this book is the definitive treatment of this entertaining topic.

Contents:

  • A Bluffer's Guide to The Underworld: An Introduction to the Hollow Earth
  • Theories and Descriptions of the Inner Earth, from Kicher to Symmes
  • Relation D'Un Voyage Du Pole Arctique Au Pole Antarctique
  • Lamekis ou les voyages extraordinaries d'un Egyptien dans la terre interieure
  • The Journey of Niels Klim to the World Underground
  • The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins
  • A Voyage to the World in the Center of the Earth
  • L'aventurier Francois
  • L'Icosameron
  • John Cleves Symmes Jr. and Symzonia
  • Collin de Plancy: Voyage au centre de la terre
  • Edgar Allen Poe and "the Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym"
  • Jules Verne: Voyage au centre de la terre
  • After Verne: Later Developments

The Centenarian: or, The Two Beringhelds

Early Classics of Science Fiction: Book 22

Honore de Balzac

Written for serial publication in 1822 under the pseudonym Horace de Saint-Aubin, this Faustian tale by Balzac has never before been available in English. More than a long-lost curiosity by an important writer, The Centenarian is also a seminal work of early science fiction, crucial to understanding both the development of the genre and the craft of this great author.

Beringheld, a 400-year-old "mad scientist," discovered the fluid necessary to human life, but he must extract the vital fluid of others to enlarge his own powers.

Balzac intertwines the mythic and the modern in ways that would prove enormously influential to science fiction. Like Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, this novel bridges the gap that separates alchemy and magic from the practice and problems of science. It is also crucial to an understanding of Balzac's oeuvre, as it anticipates significant themes of power, knowledge, and secrecy.

This Wesleyan edition features notes, appendices, and a critical introduction.

The Sleeper Awakes

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 6

H. G. Wells

The Sleeper Awakes is H. G. Wells's wildly imaginative story of London in the twenty-second century and the man who by accident becomes owner and master of the world. In 1897 a Victorian gentleman falls into a sleep from which he cannot be waked. During his two centuries of slumber he becomes the Sleeper, the most well known and powerful person in the world. All property is bequeathed to the Sleeper to be administered by a Council on his behalf. The common people, increasingly oppressed, view the Sleeper as a mythical liberator whose awakening will free them from misery.

The Sleeper awakes in 2100 to a futuristic London adorned with wondrous technological trappings yet staggering under social injustice and escalating unrest. His awakening sends shock waves throughout London, from the highest meetings of the Council to the workers laboring in factories in the bowels of the city. Daring rescues and villainous treachery abound as workers and capitalists fight desperately for control of the Sleeper.

Beyond Thirty (The Lost Continent)

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 12

Edgar Rice Burroughs

By the year 2137 Europe has become a largely forgotten, savage wilderness. Fierce bands of hunters rove the crumbling ruins of once mighty, war-ravaged cities. On the other side of the Atlantic a prosperous Pan-American Federation has emerged, claiming all lands and seas between the 30th and 175th longitudes and forbidding contact with the rest of the world. All who cross beyond thirty are sentenced to death.

Beyond Thirty is the story of Captain Jefferson Turck and the crew of his aero-submarine, who through accident and sabotage are forced beyond the thirtieth longitude and embark on an epic quest to rediscover the legendary lands of the Old World. Their adventures stand as one of Edgar Rice Burroughs's most imaginative and subtly crafted tales. Burroughs wrote the story in 1915 in reaction to the growing horrors of the First World War, and his devastating vision of its consequences provides a haunting and enduring warning for the twenty-first century.

Has also been published as The Lost Continent.

The Last War: A World Set Free

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 14

H. G. Wells

"From nearly two hundred centres, and every week added to their number, roared the unquenchable crimson conflagrations of the atomic bombs. The flimsy fabric of the world's credit had vanished, industry was completed disorganised, and every city, every thickly populated area was starving or trembled on the verge of starvation. Most of the capital cities of the world were burning; millions of people had already perished, and over great areas government was at an end."

The Last War erupts in Europe, rapidly escalating from bloody trench warfare and vicious aerial duels into a world-consuming, atomic holocaust. Paris is engulfed by an atomic maelstrom, Berlin is an ever-flaming crater, the cold waters of the North Sea roar past Dutch dikes and sweep across the Low Countries. Moscow, Chicago, Tokyo, London, and hundreds of other cities become radioactive wastelands. Governments topple, age-old cultural legacies are destroyed, and the stage is set for a new social and political order.

The Last War is H. G. Wells's chilling and prophetic tale of a world gone mad with atomic weapons and of the rebirth of human-kind from the rubble. Written long before the atomic age, Wells's novel is a riveting and intelligent history of the future that discusses for the first time the horrors of the atomic bomb, offering a startling vision of humanity purged by a catastrophic atomic war.

Originally and alternatively published as The World Set Free.

The War in the Air

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 23

H. G. Wells

At the beginning of the twentieth century the invention of the airplane revolutionizes warfare and precipitates a devastating world war. Nations race to build armadas of airships; cities across the globe are bombed; flying navies clash above the Alps and India. The United States is invaded from the east and the west. German and American airships duel over the Atlantic, and New York is bombarded by German flying machines. Confederation of Eastern Asia airships soar above the Rockies, soon engaging in deadly dogfights with the German air fleet above Niagara Falls.

In The War in the Air, the astonishingly prophetic vision of H. G. Wells reveals how one invention can change the world. Before the World Wars, Wells predicted that airplanes would be used for bombing, that urban areas would become especially vulnerable to aerial attacks, that dogfights and stealth attacks by air fleets would become a normal part of warfare, and that distance and the expanse of oceans no longer would be guarantors of safety for America or other countries. Visionary in its time and chillingly relevant a century later, The War in the Air continues to remind us that humankind's greatest evil lies in devices of its own making.

A Journey in Other Worlds: A Romance of the Future

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 30

John Jacob Astor IV

What did our ancestors dream of when they gazed up at the stars and looked beyond the present? Wildly imaginative but grounded in reasoned scientific speculation, A Journey in Other Worlds races far ahead of the nineteenth century to imagine what life would be like in the year 2000. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, Earth is effectively a corporate technocracy, with big businesses using incredible advances in science to improve life on the planet as a whole. Seeking other planets habitable for the growing human population, the spaceship Callisto, powered by an antigravitational force known as apergy, embarks on a momentous tour of the solar system. Jupiter proves to be a wilderness paradise, full of threatening beasts and landscapes of inspired beauty, where the explorers must fight for their lives. Dangers less tangible but equally deadly await the Callisto crew on Saturn, which yields profound secrets about their fate and the ultimate destiny of mankind.

Thoughtful, adventurous, and replete with a dazzling array of futuristic devices, A Journey in Other Worlds is a classic, unforgettable story of utopias and humankind's restless exploration of the stars.

Gladiator

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 33

Philip Wylie

"'What would you do if you were the strongest man in the world, the strongest thing in the world, mightier than the machine?' He made himself guess answers for that rhetorical inquiry. 'I would run the universe single-handed. I would scorn the universe and turn it to my own ends. I would be a criminal. I would rip open banks and gut them. I would kill and destroy. I would be a secret, invisible blight. I would set out to stamp crime off the earth.'"

Hugo Danner is the strongest man on earth, the result of a monstrous experiment by his scientist father. Nearly invulnerable, he can run faster than a train, leap higher than trees, lift a wrecked vehicle to rescue its pinned driver, and hurl boulders like baseballs. His remarkable abilities, however, cannot gain him what he desires most--acceptance--for Hugo Danner is desperately lonely, shunned and feared for his enormous strength.

An enduring classic in speculative fiction and the reported inspiration for the original comic hero, Superman, Gladiator is a melancholic tale of a boy set apart because of his unique gift and his lifelong struggle to come to terms with it.

The Savage Gentleman

Frontiers of Imagination: Book 62

Philip Wylie

Betrayed by his wife, Stephen Stone spirits his son, Henry, away to a remote tropical island and trains him to be an ideal physical specimen and a perfect gentleman. After years of isolation, Henry Stone is now a young man, standing a full six feet two inches tall and weighing 190 pounds. His hair is bronze, his eyes turquoise, his skin mahogany--a magnificent man. When Henry finally returns to civilization, he finds that his father's business has grown into a news empire. Though he is the owner of this huge conglomerate, a great conversationalist and excellent company, well versed in etiquette, and extraordinarily nice, Henry has never seen a woman. Indeed his father has taught him never to trust a female and that love itself is a myth. When Henry collides with the contemporary world and the modern woman, the collision is necessarily fascinating and complicated for both Henry and the society he is discovering.

Four-Sided Triangle

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 9

William F. Temple

THE ETERNAL LOVE TRIANGLE...

This is the story of how two men and one woman reach a solution to the eternal love triangle through the use of a secret scientific device--a machine that will reproduce anything... or anyone!

Fame and honor come to them, and then this incredible situation turns savage. For there is no escape from the net of the four-sided love triangle...

The Rat Race

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 10

Jay Franklin

The novel concerns Lieutenant Commander Frank Jacklin who is blown up in a thorium bomb explosion while on the battleship Alaska. He awakens in the body of Winnie Tompkins who had perpetrated the explosion. As Tompkins, he learns of a plot by German agents to poison Franklin D. Roosevelt and he tries to warn the authorities. He continues to become involved in intrigue until another accident restores Tompkins to his body, leaving Jacklin in the body of a dog.

The City in the Sea

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 11

Wilson Tucker

His first sf novel, The City in the Sea (1951), deals with a matriarchal culture which begins to re-invade a USA reverted to savagery.

Seeds of Life

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 13

John Taine

Seeds of Life, in short, is the story of Neils Bork, an alcoholic and failure raised to supernal heights of scientific genius and altruism by a scientific accident. And it is the story of what became of his golden dream of free, limitless energy for all, and of the marriage he thought would be crowned with glorious offspring.

Murder in Space

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 23

David V. Reed

"Murder in Space," is a great mystery set in deep space. There was a place in the asteroid belt called the Hive. It was a deadly whirl of destruction filled with thousands of spiraling asteroids--where no spaceship could enter and return in one piece. And deep within it lurked an unsolved murder.

Terwilliger Ames was the best attorney this side of Earth; but when he was swayed by the charms of a beautiful young woman into accepting a murder case, he had no idea his life would soon be in grave danger, and that his adventures would lead him to the deepest part of the asteroid belt in search of a cold-blooded killer.

An exceptional, thought-provoking outer space murder mystery.

Double Jeopardy

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 30

Fletcher Pratt

Double Jeopardy is a science fiction fix-up novel by Fletcher Pratt.

It was first published in hardcover by Doubleday in 1952, and is a combination of two shorter pieces, the novellas "Double Jeopardy" and "The Square Cube Law," originally published in the magazine Thrilling Wonder Stories in the issues for April, 1952 and June, 1952, respectively.

The story features Pratt's detective hero George Helmfleety Jones in two adventures dealing with the ramifications of a newly discovered matter-duplication process. The first concerns a case of industrial espionage involving the bootlegging of duplicated drugs, and includes Jones's marriage to a duplicated woman. The second is a locked-room mystery in which a fortune is somehow stolen from a sealed, pilotless cargo plane.

Address: Centauri

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 32

F. L. Wallace

The accidentals were human... but not human enough for Earth. Humans had abolished nearly every disease, deformity, and defect; but there were still a few that couldn't be fixed by surgery or cures. Those people who couldn't be cured or repaired to reflect the perfection of the rest of the populace just didn't belong. They were called accidentals. Their home was an asteroid called Handicap Haven--the residents called it the Junkpile. But there were those among the accidentals who longed for something better--a greater sense of freedom, and the vast reaches of space seemed to hold promise of that. So against the wishes of the Solar Committee, the Junkpile was piloted out of the solar system, toward the Centauri cluster. The only question remaining was whether or not the renegade asteroid could reach its new home before the long arm of the committee could reach out and stop them.

The Secret People

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 37

Raymond F. Jones

Also published as The Deviates.

In a world where but one man in a hundred, and eight women in a hundred, could produce children, only one science counted: Genetics. And the most respected, feared, and hated man in the world was the Chief of the Genetics Bureau, Robert Wellton. It was under his direction that gene charts were made of every citizen, and where those who dared to take the test discovered their fate. A few were Normals, who could be parents; the majority were Deviate-carriers, whose progeny would be monsters -- Uglies, as the Deviates were called.

Wellton alone knew the truth. The Genetics Program was failing, for fewer Normals were discovered every year. More and more citizens were falling back on their legal right not to be tested, not daring to learn that they might be Deviate-carriers. The whole world hungered for children, but each man and woman wanted to be the parents of the children they reared; and the fortunate few were hated by the vast majority.

But Wellton's father, who had been Genetics Chief before him, had discovered that not all Deviates were Uglies -- Nature's failures. Some were successes, improved human beings. These were telepathic and long-lived; their average intelligence level was that of the most intelligent Normals. They were what humanity needed.

Humanity could not accept them. Bitter and hate-filled, they would not believe that a Deviate could be anything but a monster; and the legal forces of the entire world were committed to the extermination of all Uglier on sight. Thus, Adam Wellton's giant plan was devised. And when he was assassinated, Robert Wellton carried it on. The plan called for the creation of a secret people -- the Children.

Born of Normal mothers, they were all Wellton's sons and daughters, bearing his improved genes. Telepathic as he was, Wellton was in mental contact with the Children from the moment of their birth, comforting and guiding them, sending them away from civilization to a hidden colony in the Canadian wilds. Here, under the direction of Wellton's first son, Barron, they built their own world. Here they waited for the mysterious being they knew only as the Father, who had promised to come to them some day and lead them to their destiny. For Wellton had never seen any of the Children -- nor had any of them seen him.

Then disaster struck, while the second generation of Children was growing up. A powerful committee, headed by a bitter man who suspected the existence of concealed Deviates, started an investigation. Wellton knew that Rossi and his associates would discover the secret, sooner or later. And there would be only one result: the Children would be hunted down and wiped out.

Thus starts a moving novel of fear and hope in a world where the only hope for humanity lay in that which all men feared.

The White Widows

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 42

Sam Merwin, Jr.

TO SAVE THE WORLD, THEY PLOTTED TO WIPE OUT ALL MALES!

This science fiction classic begins when Larry Finlay, a young and unsuspecting chemist, discovers sinister forces have taken an interest in his new approach to the seemingly innocuous problem of hemophilia. Soon, Finlay is unwittingly caught up in a nightmare plot of violence and counter-violence. Behind it is the sinister cabal that calls itself The White Widows. But who are what are they? When Larry learns all these events are tied in to the concept of parthenogenesis, he realizes that a certain woman scientist has found the secret of giving birth without the need of males. She and the other White Widows are determined to end war, greed, violence, poverty, and the idea of cut-throat competition by eliminating all men! Particularly the man named Larry Finlay! The only person he can turn to for help is the woman he loves. If he can trust her with his life... And he'll have to!

The Male Response

Galaxy Science Fiction: Book 45

Brian W. Aldiss

Events move fast in Umbalathorp, the capital city of the new African republic of Goya. When Soames Noyes, a young Englishman of the old school (public, of course) arrives, he finds himself caught in more than one stream of conflicting ideas - and more than one bed of conflicting women... An incisive and current investigation of sexual response, politics, and the drives which govern men.

The Doings of Raffles Haw

Greenhill Science Fiction Series: Book 4

Arthur Conan Doyle

This is scientific romance about a disenchanted gold maker who has discovered a way to turn lead into solid gold and uses his wealth to help people. But when he sees that his philanthropic activities don't benefit anyone, he becomes disillusioned.

Raffles Haw, a mysterious millionaire, moves to Staffordshire, England amid much gossip and speculation such is the grandeur of his new home. Upon his arrival, Haw befriends the McIntyre family. McIntyre senior was a wealthy gun merchant before going bankrupt and losing his sanity. But this is only the start of the mysterious family's tale and the deadly secrets they hold close.

Planetoid 127

Greenhill Science Fiction Series: Book 5

Edgar Wallace

A young man finds that his old science teacher and benefactor, Professor Colson, is in contact with another world. The information the Professor is receiving has made him rich, but has also made him a powerful enemy who will stop at nothing to discover the Professor's secret and use it for his own ends.

The Land of the Changing Sun

Gregg Press Science Fiction Series: Book 18

Will N. Harben

The Land of the Changing Sun (1894), is a Lost-World tale featuring an Underground society named Alpha, which the author seems to have conceived of as a Utopia; founded 200 years earlier under the Arctic - in caverns, however, not inside a Hollow Earth - by a group of inventive Englishmen, it is lit and heated by an artificial sun, which moves on tracks and changes colour pleasingly. A cruel Eugenic regime causes the exiling of any person deemed defective. Intruding magma threatens this world, and its inhabitants decide to evacuate Alpha in advanced submarines.

Pharoah's Broker

Gregg Press Science Fiction Series: Book 40

Ellsworth Douglass

Pharaoh's Broker: Being the Very Remarkable Experiences in Another World of Isidor Werner (Written by Himself).

This novel, publishsed in 1899, is an interplanetary romance set on Mars. Parallel Evolution has resulted in a society almost identical to that of Egypt in the time of Joseph. In the end the hero, having been a grain-broker in Chicago, is able to take on Joseph's role.

Iter Lunaire

Gregg Press Science Fiction Series: Book 44

David Russen

Iter Lunare; Or, A Voyage to the Moon, Containing Some Considerations on the Nature of That Planet, the Possibility of Getting Thither, with Other Pleasant Conceits About the Inhabitants, Their Manners, and Customs.

Originally published in 1703, Iter Lunaire is one of the first books to discuss the real possibility of exploring space, the methods of doing so and what might be found there.

Taking Cyrano De Bergerac's classic "Comic History" Voyage to the Moon (1657) and Francis Godwin's novel The Man in the Moone (1638) as jump-off points, author Russen discusses the pros and cons of the French writer's fanciful methods of space travel... and adds some of his own, including what may be the most unusual method of traveling to the Moon ever suggested. Along the way, Russen anticipates such modern scientific developments as the germ theory of disease and hyperlinked reference books.

Armageddon: A Tale of Love, War, and Invention

Gregg Press Science Fiction Series: Book 47

Stanley Waterloo

In Armageddon: A Tale of Love, War, and Invention (1898), Anglo-American supremacy over the rest of the world is achieved through the use of an armoured dirigible Airship in a near-future Future War.

Lord of Thunder

Hosteen Storm / Beast Master: Book 2

Andre Norton

Storm's beast master skills and animal partners are needed to unravel the mystery behind a huge gathering of indigenous Norbies. Only Storm and Logan Quade can penetrate the Norbie's clan secrets and discover what is behind the threat of an uprising that could destroy the tenuous peace between the colonists and the aliens who share the planet.

Beast Master's Ark

Hosteen Storm / Beast Master: Book 3

Andre Norton
Lyn McConchie

A Grand new Beast Master adventure...

Death-which-Comes-in-the-Night

More than thirty years ago in Beast Master and Lord of Thunder, Andre Norton created a memorable character, Hosteen Storm. A Native American soldier for Earth, he barely escaped his doomed home world when the Xic destroyed it. Armed with his soldier's skills, his ancestors' insights, and an uncanny ability to communicate mind-to-mind with animals, Storm is a hero unlike any other in science fiction.

Now, science fiction Grand Master Andre Norton has teamed up with Lyn McConchie to pit Storm against his most dangerous enemy yet: Death-which-Comes-in-the-Night.

It is silent. It leaves no tracks. The only evidence that remains is the perfectly cleaned bones of its victims. And it has developed a taste for humans.

No one has survived an attack yet, and the natives of Storm's adopted planet, Arzor, are moving in on human territory as they try to escape the silent scourge. The already high tensions between Humans and Natives soar, sparking a race against time as Storm attempts to solve the mystery of Death-which-comes-in-the-Night before Humans and Natives clash.

But he can't do it without help from Tani, a genetic engineer from the Ark, a ship traveling space with genetic material from across the galaxy, including the destroyed Earth. But Tani has been poisoned against Beast Masters by her mother. She must conquer her own unreasoning hatred, and awaken the powerful Beast Master in herself, before she and Storm can conquer Death-which-Comes-in-the-Night and uncover the great conspiracy that threatens not only Arzor, but all human-occupied planets.

Beast Master's Circus

Hosteen Storm / Beast Master: Book 4

Andre Norton
Lyn McConchie

Someone is kidnapping the animals of beast masters' teams. On planet after planet, telepathically gifted people are being attacked-some of them murdered-by a conspiracy to take their precious animals.

Laris, an orphan who trains exotic alien creatures for an interstellar circus, knows that somehow her employer is connected to the deadly plot. She also knows that those involved will kill her if she talks.

Beast master Hosteen Storm has heard about the plot, but when the circus comes to Arzor, he doesn't realize his mortal peril. The circus, with its many colorful acts, is danger cloaked in the swirling excitement of the show. Laris loves all animals, and is herself able to communicate with them. When she meets Hosteen and becomes friends with him and his family, she desperately wants to warn him, to save him and his animals. But as the circus nears the end of its stay on Arzor, the deadly plotters prepare to strike at those Laris cares about... and at her, if she interferes!

Beast Master's Quest

Hosteen Storm / Beast Master: Book 5

Andre Norton
Lyn McConchie

Laris is a young orphaned ex-refugee gifted with the beast master ability allowing her to communicate with animals. Her closest companion is a remarkably intelligent and mysterious cat-like creature named Prauo, whose origin is shrouded in mystery. Laris, having made a home for herself with the Quades, a family of Arzor ranchers, also has become friends with beast masters Tani and Hosteen Storm, who help her develop her beast master skills.

When Laris inherits a spaceship from a distant relative, she realizes that she might now fulfill her dream of finding Prauo's home planet. But it won't be easy, and she is relieved when she is able to convince her new extended family to embark with her on a journey into the unknown depths of space.

What Laris and her friends find in space, however, tests their beast master abilities and threatens their lives. Prauo's homeworld is beset by dangers the intrepid travelers could not have anticipated. It will take all of their talents and experience to get back to Arzor alive.

The Messiah of the Cylinder

Hyperion Classics of Science Fiction: Book 6

Victor Rousseau

The story of a man who has been placed in suspended animation for 100 years.

The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins

Hyperion Classics of Science Fiction: Book 7

Robert Paltock

The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins, a Cornish Man; Relating Particularly his Shipwreck near the South Pole; his wonderful Passage thro' a subterraneous Cavern into a kind of new World; his there meeting with a Gawry or flying woman, whose Life he preserv'd, and afterwards married her; his extraordinary Conveyance to the Country of Glums and Gawrys, or Men and Women that fly. Likewise a Description of this strange Country, with the Laws, Customs, and Manners of its Inhabitants, and the Author's remarkable Transactions among them.

The Life and Adventures of Peter Wilkins is somewhat on the same plan as Robinson Crusoe, the special feature being the gawry, or flying woman, whom the hero discovered on his island, and married.

Earth Girl

Jarra: Book 1

Janet Edwards

2788. Only the handicapped live on Earth. While everyone else portals between worlds, 18-year-old Jarra is among the one in a thousand people born with an immune system that cannot survive on other planets. Sent to Earth at birth to save her life, she has been abandoned by her parents. She can’t travel to other worlds, but she can watch their vids, and she knows all the jokes they make. She’s an ‘ape’, a ‘throwback’, but this is one ape girl who won’t give in.

Jarra invents a fake background for herself – as a normal child of Military parents – and joins a class of norms that is on Earth to excavate the ruins of the old cities. When an ancient skyscraper collapses, burying another research team, Jarra’s role in their rescue puts her in the spotlight. No hiding at back of class now. To make life more complicated, she finds herself falling in love with one of her classmates – a norm from another planet. Somehow, she has to keep the deception going.

A freak solar storm strikes the atmosphere, and the class is ordered to portal off-world for safety – no problem for a real child of military parents, but fatal for Jarra. The storm is so bad that the crews of the orbiting solar arrays have to escape to planet below: the first landing from space in 600 years. And one is on collision course with their shelter.

Jumper

Jumper: Book 1

Steven Gould

What if you could go anywhere in the world, in the blink of an eye? Where would you go? What would you do

Davy can teleport. To survive, Davy must learn to use and control his power in a world that is more violent and complex than he ever imagined. But mere survival is not enough for him. Davy wants to find others like himself, others who can Jump.

Kagerou Daze 1: In a Daze

Kagerou Daze: Book 1

Jin

Shintarou Kisaragi, a NEET-person "Not in Education, Employment, or Training"-has refused to leave the comfort of his room for two whole years. But Shintarou's easy and solitary life is about to take an unexpected turn when his computer crashes and he is forced to venture into the world he was happy to shut out forever... and stumbles into the middle of a hostage situation!

Kagerou Daze 2: A Headphone Actor

Kagerou Daze: Book 2

Jin

He's gotten through one ridiculous crisis, but now former shut-in Shintaro Kisaragi might have bigger problems. Now that he knows about the Blindfold Gang, they've decided to draft him as their newest member-whether he likes it or not! Meanwhile Ene and Momo are about to learn the secrets behind the founding of the Gang, along with a shocking revelation about Ene's connection to it. Will Shintaro ever get his beloved NEET lifestyle back?

Kagerou Daze 3: The Children Reason

Kagerou Daze: Book 3

Jin

The past is never really gone.

On a certain summer day, a certain boy and girl meet. What is it that lurks behind the strange experience they chance to have? What is the link that connects all of this? The truth is finally coming to light, but can the Mekakushi-dan, armed with only their eyes, solve the riddle? The third novel from Internet phenomenon and multimedia creator JIN is here!

Kagerou Daze 4: The Missing Children

Kagerou Daze: Book 4

Jin

A certain boy and girl meet on a certain endless summer day. They thought they were alone, misunderstood by everyone, but the powers they hold in their eyes lead them to a group that does understand them: the Mekakushi-dan. They're not alone anymore, but now they have a new mystery to solve: What is the phenomenon of the "kagerou daze," and who is the shadowy figure behind it?

Kagerou Daze 5: The Deceiving

Kagerou Daze: Book 5

Jin

Despite their youth, sorrow stalks Kano, Kido, and Seto. Their strange powers prevent them from fitting in at their orphanage, so finally, they escape. The trio is taken in by the Tateyama household, where the cheerful Ayano lives--but the peace is short-lived...

Kagerou Daze 6: Over the Dimension

Kagerou Daze: Book 6

Jin

It was a never ending long, long summer day when Shintarou feels a sudden change in his body. While this is happening, he has a momentous meeting with his upperclassman, who tells Shintarou the secret truths about this world's past. What in the world is going on?

The Goddess of Atvatabar

Leonaur Classic Science Fiction: Book 3

William R. Bradshaw

Being the History of the Discovery of the Interior World and Conquest of Atvatabar...

is a Utopian hollow Earth novel using Symmesian geography from the ideas of John Cleves Symmes, Jr.

Entering the interior of the world via a Symmes Hole, the protagonists from the world above find an advanced civilization who use spiritual power to do everything from maintain youth to resurrect the dead. In a civil war that erupts following the Atvatabar Goddess's love for a surface man, Lexington White, the ruling powers are overthrown and Lexington White becomes the new king of Atvatabar, the Goddess his queen, and rich trade relations with the surface are opened.

Mindkiller

Lifehouse: Book 1

Spider Robinson

Wireheads, addicted to an electric current led into the pleasure centers of the brain, are the new junkies. Karen, a former wirehead who barely escaped death by pleasure, is determined to bring down those who sell the wireheading equipment, but she and her lover Joe intead turn up evidence of a shadowy global conspiracy - not to control the world, but to keep anyone from realizing that the masters of mind control have been controllling us all for some time now...

Lifehouse

Lifehouse: Book 3

Spider Robinson

June Bellamy had gone for a walk in a park - and came back with memories missing. She didn't know that, but her partner could tell because she'd told her answering machine about strange people in the park. Now June and Paul are on the run from insidious superhumans who can edit their memories and track them down no matter where or how well they hide. They are desperate - but not nearly as desperate as their pursuers...

Vermilion Sands

Masters of Science Fiction: Book 1

J. G. Ballard

Table of Contents:

  • Prima Belladonna - (1956)
  • The Thousand Dreams of Stellavista - (1962)
  • Cry Hope, Cry Fury! - (1967)
  • Venus Smiles - (1957)
  • Studio 5, The Stars - (1961)
  • The Cloud-Sculptors of Coral D - (1967)
  • Say Goodbye to the Wind - (1970)
  • The Screen Game - (1963)

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket

Pym: Book 1

Edgar Allan Poe

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym is an archetypal American story of escape from home and family which traces a young man's rite of passage through a series of terrible brushes with death during a fateful sea voyage. But it also goes much deeper, as Pym encounters various interpretative dilemmas, at last leaving the reader with a broken-off ending that defies solution.

Apart from its violence and mystery, the tale calls attention to the act of writing and to the problem of representing truth. Layer upon layer of elaborate hoaxes include its author's own role of posing as ghost-writer of the narrative; Pym - his only novel - has become the key text for our understanding of Poe.

A Strange Discovery

Pym: Book 2

Charles Romyn Dake

A "completion" of Edgar Allan Poe's Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (1838).

In this early work of science fiction narrated by an Englishman in America on business, Doctors Bainbridge and Castleton discover that their patient is one Dirk Peters, a character from Edgar Allan Poe's novel The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym. Bainbridge recounts the story Peters tells, of his journey with Pym to a strange land at the South Pole, where they find an island utopia inhabited by descendants of fourth-century Romans.

The Sphinx of the Ice Realm

Pym: Book 2

Jules Verne

The first complete English translation of Jules Verne's epic fantasy novel. The Full Text of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym by Edgar Allan Poe is also included.

Decades after Edgar Allan Poe's longest and weirdest tale, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, was published--the protagonist disappearing into the misty, mystifying Antarctic seas; his fate unknown--Jules Verne took up the challenge to answer what had happened to him.

In The Sphinx of the Ice Realm, he penned the most amazing journey of his fabled career: a voyage across the bottom of the world! An astonishing mix of manhunt, sea story, scientific speculation, and polar nightmare, Verne's epic fantasy novel appears here for the first time as a new and complete translation by noted Verne expert Frederick Paul Walter. The book is a treat for any fan of science fiction and fantasy, and includes many fascinating notes for students and scholars alike. In addition, the book features a complete, reader-friendly rendition of the original Poe tale that sparked Verne's uniquely imaginative response.

The story has also been published under various titles: The Sphinx of the Ice Fields, An Antarctic Mystery, The Sphnix of the Ice.

Quantico

Quantico: Book 1

Greg Bear

The Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem has been blown to bits by extremists, and, in retaliation, thousands have died in another major attack on the United States. Now the FBI has been dispatched to deal with a new menace. A plague targeted to ethnic groups--Jews or Muslims or both--has the potential to wipe out entire populations. But the FBI itself is under political assault. There's a good chance agents William Griffin, Fouad Al-Husam, and Jane Rowland will be part of the last class at Quantico. As the young agents hunt a brilliant homegrown terrorist, they join forces with veteran bio-terror expert Rebecca Rose. But the plot they uncover--and the man they chase--prove to be far more complex than anyone expects.

Mariposa

Quantico: Book 2

Greg Bear

The world just keeps getting tougher and more complicated. America teeters on the edge of bankruptcy because of crushing foreign debt and an apparent savior, The Talos Corporation, delivers training for soldiers and security forces around the world, logistical support and badly-needed troops economically, but with a hidden cost that's both sinister and disturbing.

The three rookie FBI agents who survived the challenges portrayed in Quantico, have gone their separate ways but seem fated to be drawn back together in an alliance against a surprising challenge for which no one seems prepared. Rebecca Rose is brought back from an extended sabbatical when the President is shot and her second-in-command is implicated in an horrific crime--and all the threads point deeper into Talos's secretive activities. Fouad Al-Husam, working undercover inside Talos, has uncovered and been forced to hide vital information of a takeover plot that threatens America's independence.

Nathan Trace, victim of a violent incident in the Middle East, struggles with post-traumatic stress and seems to be recovering through participation in a treatment program, code-named Mariposa, which has unexpected side-effects that turn patients into brilliant, detached and sociopathic individuals--very smart and extremely deadly.

Only a desperate combination of misfits and survivors can combat an apparently inevitable collapse of American organization that will lead to the fall of democracy.

Robur the Conqueror

Robur: Book 1

Jules Verne

Robur the Conqueror is a science fiction novel by Jules Verne. The story begins with strange lights and sounds, including blaring trumpet music, reported in the skies all over the world. The events are capped by the mysterious appearance of black flags with gold suns atop tall historic landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty in New York, the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt, and the Eiffel Tower in Paris. These events are all the work of the mysterious Robur (Latin for "oak"), a brilliant inventor who intrudes on a meeting of a flight-enthusiast's club called the Weldon Institute in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Master of the World

Robur: Book 2

Jules Verne

Read a tale of one of the original evil inventors - the genius Robur - who, like his successors, wants to take over the world. The key to Robur's power lies in his latest invention, a vehicle called The Terror. It can travel by land, air, or sea, reaching such speed that it can only be seen as a blur. John Strock, federal police officer, is assigned to investigate. But he soon finds that stopping Robur is more difficult than he bargained on!

Written in 1904, this novel by the pioneering science fiction writer Jules Verne will delight anyone who likes a flight of fancy with their adventure.

Rocket Riders Across the Ice or, Racing Against Time

Rocket Riders: Book 1

Howard Garis

A tale in the manner of Tom Swift about a rocket-sled vehicle that journeys across Alaska toward the North Pole.

Rocket Riders in Stormy Seas or, Trailing the Treasure Divers

Rocket Riders: Book 2

Howard Garis

Exciting Rocket fueled adventures beneith the waves.

Rocket Riders Over the Desert or, Seeking the Lost City

Rocket Riders: Book 3

Howard Garis

Rockets make everything easier. Seeking lost cities in the middle of the remotest desert is now within reach.

Rocket Riders in the Air or, A Chase in the Clouds

Rocket Riders: Book 4

Howard Garis

Rip roaring adventures in an era when the sky was the frontier; rockets included.

The Life and Astonishing Adventures of John Daniel

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 1

Ralph Morris

Also Published as: A Narrative of the Life and Astonishing Adventures of John Daniel, a Smith at Royston in Hertfordshire, For a Course of Seventy Years.

In which Daniel is shipwrecked on an Island south of Java, his industrious Robinsonade life being transformed when his companion turns out to be a woman, with whom he has eleven children; as the children grow, Sex issues are resolved by incest. Daniel's son, Jacob, invents a flying machine capable of Space Flight; father and son undertake a realistically-described Fantastic Voyage to the Moon, where they encounter an Alien civilization, and a ur-Food Pill in the shape of a leaf which relieves hunger and thirst. On their return to Earth, they discover on a Pacific Island a race of benign Monsters, the consequence of cross-breeding between humans and intelligent creatures from the deeps. Further adventures ensue, in Lapland and elsewhere; Daniel then returns to England to tell his tale to "Ralph Morris".

Gulliver Joi

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 5

Elbert Perce

Gulliver Joi: His Three Voyages; Being an Account of His Marvelous Adventures in Kailoo, Hydrogenia and Ejario.

Contents:

  • Voyage to Kailoo - (1851) - novella
  • Voyage to Hydrogenia - (1851) - novella
  • Voyage to Ejario - (1851) - novella

Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 9

James Cowan

Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World (1896), features an ambulatory Moon which after falling into the Pacific Ocean makes it possible for the narrator of the tale, with companions, to fly to Mars in a Balloon, where they discover a new defence of Christianity in the form of parallel Evolution and multiple incarnations of Christ.

The Conquest of the Moon: A Story of the Bayouda

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 10

Andre Laurie

The Conquest of the Moon: A Story of the Bayouda 1889), in which plans are made to drag the Moon from its orbit to land in the Sahara Desert, where its resources can be plundered; but the executors of the plan are drawn to the Moon instead.

The History of a Voyage to the Moon

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 11

Chrysostom Trueman

The tale itself is divided into two parts.

In "The Voyage", the protagonists learn how to create a new Power Source - an Antigravity element capable of propelling the Spaceship they have had constructed by an eccentric Inventor - and travel to the Moon.

In part two, "The Ideal Life", they discover a Utopia inhabited by "amnesiac reincarnations of select Earthmen", four feet tall, communitarian, pacific. Transportation is via giant roc-like birds. The protagonists, in strong contrast to the behaviour of most visitors to other worlds in the nineteenth century, neither leave nor destroy the world they have discovered.

To the Moon and Back in Ninety Days

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 12

John Young Brown

The protagonist of the SF novel, To the Moon and Back in Ninety Days: A Thrilling Narrative of Blended Science and Adventure (1922), hitches a ride on a spaceship powered by an Antigravity device, and goes to the Moon. The discovery of Selenites there turns out to be a hoax but the trip was real.

Told in a documentary style, it is profusely illustrated with photos and diagrams, including photos of the spacecraft and space-suited astronauts. Indeed, the books contains a remarkably detailed description of a working space suit (Including a photo!).

Pioneers of Space: A Trip to the Moon, Mars, and Venus

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 13

George Adamski

A mundain SF novel that sets the stage for the early rounds of the contact phenomenon.

The Moon Colony

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 16

William Dixon Bell

The Moon Colony (1937), in which the protagonists, adventurously travelling to the Moon, find there a Planetary Romance-style colony, complete with giant grasshoppers which can be ridden like horses.

Julian Epworth the head of secret service for Atlantic Pacific Airlines and his co-pilot Billy pursue a huge sky pirate zeppelin about to steal 1 million dollars in gold.

A fast paced ultra modern sci-fi adventure: planes being shot out of the sky, air pirates in liquid fueled planes, a mad scientists Herman Toplinsky scheming to colonize the moon is the leader of the sky jackers. Toplinsky has captured Julian, Billy and stowaway Joan, Julian"s sister, they are all off to the Moon, only to be greeted by an army of mammoth cricket-shaped creatures in military formation, large as a man, with six legs and two sharp antennas, holding steel pointed lances. Riding on top of the cricket creatures are men-shaped humps, small bodies with legs and arms, and an enormous knotty projection for their heads, seeing through large wide eyes, and this is only the beginning.

The Moon Conquerors

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 17

R. H. Romans

"The Moon Conquerors" is a Space Opera implausibly involving the Moon, though the tale is notable for the suggestion of an electromagnetic drive to launch a Spaceship to the Moon.

Its companion piece, "The War of the Planets" is presented as the text of a work discovered on the Moon. It is the first novel describing the history of the solar system and how a black race established 'human' life on Earth about 30,000 years ago in Africa.

Romans' book is also a uniquely science fictional plea for racial tolerance.

The Brick Moon: from the papers of Captain Frederic Ingham

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 25

Edward Everett Hale

"The Brick Moon" is a short story by Edward Everett Hale, published serially in The Atlantic Monthly starting in 1869. It is a work of speculative fiction containing the first known depiction of an artificial satellite.

"The Brick Moon" is written as if it were a journal. It describes the construction and launch into orbit of a sphere, 200 ft. in diameter, built of bricks. It is intended as a navigational aid, but is accidentally launched with people aboard. They survive, and so the story also provides the first known fictional description of a space station.

Zero to Eighty

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 27

Akkad Pseudoman

Zero to Eighty: Being my Lifetime Doings, Reflections, and Inventions: Also my Journey Around the Moon comprises the slightly wooden memoirs of "Kad" Pseudoman, whose early life incorporates some elements of the Edisonade - he discovers a gold mine in the West from which he profits mightily; he creates various Inventions, usually to do with Transportation; and he saves a country from its enemies, though the country is not America but Switzerland - but who mainly concerns himself with technical and pictorial accounts of the building of an electric-pulse gun, a tube 200 kilometres long whose muzzle is located at the top of Mount Popocatapetl, launching a Spaceship in which Pseudoman circumnavigates the Moon in 1961. The memoir ends with a visit to the Lenin Underground Village, a vast Keep built two kilometres Underground beneath Moscow as an exercise in the engineering of Utopia.

A Honeymoon in Space

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 30

George Griffith

Lenox, the Earl of Redgrave, has made the greatest scientific discovery in the history of the world: a flying ship with the power to break free of Earth's gravity and take to the stars. But before he uses it to expand humanity's understanding of the universe, he has some personal business to attend to--namely, wooing an old flame.

The lady in question is Zaidie, the daughter of Lenox's colleague Professor Rennick. With Zaidie about to be forced into a loveless marriage, Lenox knows he must do something drastic. He steals her away and takes her out of this world--literally.

Griffith's accounts of other planets are spectacularly engaging--from subterranean civilizations on the moon to the warlike Martians to the musical inhabitants of Venus. This remarkable adventure makes for a memorable honeymoon indeed.

A Trip To Venus

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 32

John Munro

A Trip to Venus (1897) is an account of a journey by Spaceship - powered by a new Antigravity as a sustaining Power Source - to an idyllic Utopia on Venus, with a brief excursion to Mercury.

Through Space to Mars or, The Longest Journey on Record

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 37

Roy Rockwood

A turn of the last-century boys adventure, which takes the heros into space, to Mars, and the wonders there.

Off on a Comet

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 44

Jules Verne

The comet Gallia, approaching very closely to the Earth, pulls off a chunk of North Africa. Captain Hector Servadac and an assortment of others survive in the comet for a period of time, and are later dropped, intact, back onto North Africa.

Also Published as Hector Servadac: or the Career of a Comet.

The Crystal City Under the Sea

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 46

Andre Laurie

This is a lost race novel of an Atlantean Kingdom remnant, living beneath the ocean off the Azores, under a glass dome.

The End of Books

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 47

Octave Uzanne

In the 'The End of Books', which is a transcript of an impromptu speech given in 1894, Octave Uzanne brilliantly anticipated the invention of the walkman, radio, TV, Ipods, hearing problems and anticipated the modern form of the 'demise of books argument' by a century.

(Good fun when read upon a kindle or any other ebook platform.)

Under the Sea to the North Pole

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 48

Pierre Maël

Written for a younger audiance, a futurist submarine ventures to where no one has gone before: the North Pole.

The Earth-Tube

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 50

Gawain Edwards

The Earth-Tube (1929), a Yellow Peril sub-genre novel, in which Asians take advantage of their possession of the invulnerable metal undulal to tunnel under South America, which they soon conquer. After a young hero has penetrated the secret, catastrophic explosions close the tunnel, inundating South America but sparing the USA, which has transformed itself into a socialist regime in response to the free gold which the Asians have been raining from the skies in an effort to destabilize the great capitalist democracy.

The Flying Legion

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 52

George Allan England

This a classic novel of adventure reflecting the tangled milieu of the Middle East just after World War I. It is a flying adventure story reflecting the enthusiasm for air travel and constantly improving technology of the period. The super aircraft of the Flying Legion, The Eagle of the Sky, could come, in effect, from the magazine covers of Science and Mechanics of the period.

If you like first rate derring do, cliff hanging situations, heroic characters fighting down to the last ditch against impossible odds, this is it!

Out of the Silence

Ron Miller Science Fiction Classics: Book 59

Erle Cox

A country farmer uncovers remnants of an advanced civilization that contain a woman, asleep in suspended animation for two thousand years.

Upon awakening, the woman, Earani, teleports herself into the office of the Australian Prime Minister and reveals her plans to take over the world -- through mind control!

Does the beautiful Earani mean to save humanity or destroy it?

Alien Planet

Science Fiction from the Great Years: Book 3

Fletcher Pratt

This novel is an expansion of "A Voice Across the Years," a story first published in Amazing Stories Quarterly, Winter 1932.

Two Earthmen, Merrick Wells and Alvin Schierstedt, meet Ashembe of Murashema, who has come from beyond the stars on an urgent mission.

Metropolis

Science Fiction from the Great Years: Book 4

Thea von Harbou

This city of the future encompasses two worlds: that of the hedonistic ruling class and that of a segregated subculture, toilers in a mechanized underworld who labor to provide the rich with their pleasures. When a charismatic leader arises, she seeks a savior to unite the disparate social orders. "Between the brain that plans and the hands that build," she declares, "there must be a mediator? the heart."

Ha'penny

Small Change: Book 2

Jo Walton

In 1949, eight years after the "Peace with Honor" was negotiated between Great Britain and Nazi Germany by the Farthing Set, England has completed its slide into fascist dicatorship. Then a bomb explodes in a London suburb.

The brilliant but politically compromised Inspector Carmichael of Scotland Yard is assigned the case. What he finds leads him to a conspiracy of peers and communists, of staunch King-and- Country patriots and hardened IRA gunmen, to murder Britain's Prime Minister and his new ally, Adolf Hitler.

Against a background of increasing domestic espionage and the suppression of Jews and homosexuals, an ad-hoc band of idealists and conservatives blackmail the one person they need to complete their plot, an actress who lives for her art and holds the key to the Fuhrer's death. From the ha'penny seats in the theatre to the ha'pennies that cover dead men's eyes, the conspiracy and the investigation swirl around one another, spinning beyond anyone's control.

In this brilliant companion to Farthing, Welsh-born World Fantasy Award winner Jo Walton continues her alternate history of an England that could have been, with a novel that is both an homage of the classic detective novels of the thirties and forties, and an allegory of the world we live in today.

Into the Niger Bend

The Barsac Mission: Book 1

Jules Verne

One of Jules verne's most exciting and prophetic science-fiction adventures has been altogether unknown to English-speaking readers until the publication of the present translation. This was the long novel Verne called The Astonishing Adventure of the Barsac Mission, the first book of which is Into The Niger Bend. An adventure novel as well as a novel of mystery and intrigue, this unusual story brings a group of daring men into the unexplored heart of Africa. Their experiences on their scientific quest under increasingly strange circumstances wil inevitably remind readers of the works of H. Rider Haggard and other masters of jungle novels.

The City in the Sahara

The Barsac Mission: Book 2

Jules Verne

The second book of a two book series called "The Astonishing Adventure of the Barsac Mission" about a group of Frenchmen & an Englishwoman traveling in Africa who're captured by a leader of a criminal group who have a secret oasis city in the desert.

The Man Who Rocked the Earth

The Man Who Rocked the Earth: Book 1

Robert W. Wood
Arthur Train

The course of World War One is interrupted by messages from a mysterious Scientist known only as PAX, who is threatening superscientific punishments if the war is not stopped. After some demonstrations, featuring Rays, a flying ship, atomic energy and the slowing of Earth's orbit, which causes vast earthquakes, the nations obey; unfortunately, PAX turns Mad Scientist, but dies before he can turn Europe into an Arctic wilderness.

This novel is notable for describing what an atomic detonation would look like in 1915, thirty years before the United States detonated the first atomic bomb.

The Moon Maker

The Man Who Rocked the Earth: Book 2

Arthur Train
Robert W. Wood

The character who discovered the dead PAX in The Man Who Rocked the Earth must now defend Earth against an approaching Asteroid. He travels with a proto-Feminist mathematician who found the errant asteroid; they change the course of the asteroid so it becomes a second Moon, and then marry.

Pilgrimage: The Book of the People

The People

Zenna Henderson

They were feared as witches and demons...

They possessed superhuman powers...

They could read minds, free objects from gravity, fly through the air...

They lived alone and outcast in an isolated canyon...

They were THE PEOPLE!

The Book of the Unnamed Midwife

The Road to Nowhere: Book 1

Meg Elison

The apocalypse will be asymmetrical.

In the aftermath of a plague that has decimated the world population, the unnamed midwife confronts a new reality in which there may be no place for her. Indeed, there may be no place for any woman except at the end of a chain. A radical rearrangement is underway. With one woman left for every ten men, the landscape that the midwife travels is fraught with danger. She must reach safety -- but is it safer to go it alone or take a chance on humanity? The friends she makes along the way will force her to choose what's more important. Civilization stirs from the ruins, taking new and experimental forms. The midwife must help a new world come into being, but birth is always dangerous... and what comes of it is beyond anyone's control.

The Demon of Cawnpore

The Steam House: Book 1

Jules Verne

First part of La maison à vapeur (1880).

Steam engines, steam vessels... why not steam land cars? Such was Jules Verne's thinking in the Age of Steam, the fabulous century of invention that paved the way for the present. And if a steam car, why not use it for exploration, for adventure and daring deeds?

And what more exotic, more adventurous place than India, the vast sub-continent of rajahs and temples and weird cults - and in Verne's time also a seething rebel-torn colony of the Victoria's Empire?

So developed Verne's marvelous adventure novel of the steam elephant, of a courageous English colonel seeking refuge and revenge, and of the steam-driven jungle caravan that took him and his band into the very heart of India's unexplored mysteries.

Tigers and Traitors

The Steam House: Book 2

Jules Verne

Second part of La maison à vapeur (1880).

Trailers and luxury travellers were ideas that Jules Verne dreamed up a century before our time...and wrote them into the most exotic scenery and the most exciting adventures.

Consider Colonel Munro's marvelous steam elephant that pulled a train of palatial houses-on-wheels through the deepest jungles of India. Add a land beset with internal chaos, banditry, and rebellious local chieftians, and you have the grounds for one of Verne's most exciting novels.

Such is Tigers and Traitors, a novel packed with such wonders as a terrifying tiger hunt, a mysterious white goddess, a fight against rampaging elephants, and the pursuit of the steam caravan by an army of furious fanatics. It's fast-paced science-fiction adventure.

Tor Double #32: Run For The Stars / Echoes of Thunder

Tor Double: Book 32

Jack Dann
Harlan Ellison
Jack C. Haldeman II

Run For The Stars:

The Kyben demolished Deald's World and their armada was heading for Earth. All that stood in their way was a man on Deald's World named Benno Tallant, about as lousy a candidate for hero as one could imagine: junkie, looter, coward, betrayer. The retreating Earth forces decide to make him the last man on Deald's World. They surgically implant a cataclysmic bomb in his body, turn him loose, and let the Kyben hunt him down.

See Benno Run. Run, Benno, Run Like Hell.

Echoes of Thunder:

No man, Mohawk or white, walks the high steel like John Stranger.

Tor Double #34: Rule Golden / Double Meaning

Tor Double: Book 34

Damon Knight

Contents of Tor Double:

  • 1 - Introduction: Beauty, Stupidity, Injustice, and Science Fiction - essay by Damon Knight (variant of Beauty, Stupidity, Injustice, and Science Fiction 1990)
  • 19 - Rule Golden - (1954) - novella by Damon Knight
  • 103 - Double Meaning - (1953) - novella by Damon Knight Note: An expanded version of this story was published under the title "The Rithian Terror" by Ace Books(1965).

Rule Golden:

As a newspaper publisher, Robert James Dahls found the news disconcerting; in fact, inexplicable. News items like two boxers simultaneously knocking each other out, prison guards sick and unable to guard the prisoners, policemen shooting fleeing culprits and collapsing themselves, battered wives with husbands suffering the same injuries that they inflicted.

Dahl catches wind of a large experimental facility that is being led by the U.S. Department of Defense. His suspicions coincide with the strange, beyond-coincidental behavior that he's been observing. For what's on the grounds of the facility is much more radical than anything that was claimed to be found in Roswell. Not just an alien but one that has a strange effect on the human race. Where the Golden Rule in reversed: Be done by as you do to others. How can we get along without conflict? What will happen to the human race? Dahl soon finds himself a fugitive helping a bizarre alien save or destroy the Earth!

Double Meaning:

A psychological thriller that follows an Earth security officer in the future who is racing against time to locate an alien spy.

First published in 1953, this is probably the first sci-fi book to feature a surveillance drone.

Tor Double #35: Silent Thunder / Universe

Tor Double: Book 35

Robert A. Heinlein
Dean Ing

Silent Thunder:

A techno thriller. A unique mix of Sci-Fi and historic fiction. It's said to resonate with political events of the 1991 timeframe.

Universe:

This novelette was combined with its sequel, "Common Sense", to form "Orphans of the Sky" in 1963.

The gigantic, cylindrical generation ship Vanguard, originally destined for "Far Centaurus", is cruising without guidance through the interstellar medium as a result of a long-ago mutiny that killed most of the officers. Over time, the descendants of the surviving loyal crew have forgotten the purpose and nature of their ship and lapsed into a pre-technological culture marked by superstition. They come to believe the "Ship" is the entire universe, so that "To move the ship" is considered an oxymoron, and references to the Ship's "voyage" are interpreted as religious metaphor. They are ruled by an oligarchy of "officers" and "scientists". Most crew members are simple illiterate farmers, seldom or never venturing to the "upper decks" where the "muties" (an abbreviation of "mutants" or "mutineers") dwell. Among the crew, all identifiable mutants are killed at birth.

Five Weeks in a Balloon

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 1

Jules Verne

A Journey of Discovery by Three Englishmen in Africa.

One of the great "first novels" in world literature is now available in a complete, accurate English translation. Prepared by two of America's leading Verne scholars, Frederick Paul Walter and Arthur B. Evans, this edition honors not only Verne's farseeing science, but also his zest, style, and storytelling brilliance.

Initially published in 1863, Five Weeks in a Balloon was the first novel in the author's Extraordinary Voyages series. It tells the tale of a 4,000-mile balloon trip over the mysterious continent of Africa, a trip that wouldn't actually take place until well into the next century. Fusing adventure, comedy, and science fiction, Five Weeks has all the key ingredients of classic Verne: sly humor and cheeky characters, an innovative scientific invention, a tangled plot that's full of suspense and surprise, and visions of an unknown realm.

As part of the Early Classics of Science Fiction series, this critical edition features extensive notes, all the illustrations from the original French edition, and a complete Verne biography and bibliography. Five Weeks in a Balloon will be a prized addition to libraries and science fiction reading lists, and a must-read for Verne fans and steampunk connoisseurs.

Journey to the Center of the Earth

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 3

Jules Verne

A classic of nineteenth-century French literature, this science fiction tale delves into the depths of the Earth, and by so doing, reveals the staggeringly long history of our planet.

The Begum's Millions

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 18

Jules Verne

When two European scientists unexpectedly inherit an Indian rajah's fortune, each builds an experimental city of his dreams in the wilds of the American Northwest. France-Ville is a harmonious urban community devoted to health and hygiene, the specialty of its French founder, Dr. François Sarrasin. Stahlstadt, or City of Steel, is a fortress-like factory town devoted to the manufacture of high-tech weapons of war. Its German creator, the fanatically pro-Aryan Herr Schultze, is Verne's first truly evil scientist. In his quest for world domination and racial supremacy, Schultze decides to showcase his deadly wares by destroying France-Ville and all its inhabitants.

Both prescient and cautionary, The Begum's Millions is a masterpiece of scientific and political speculation and constitutes one of the earliest technological utopia/dystopias in Western literature. This Wesleyan edition features notes, appendices, and a critical introduction as well as all the illustrations from the original French edition.

This work has also been published under the name The Begum's Fortune.

Carpathian Castle

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 37

Jules Verne

The descriptions of the quaint villagers of Werst, their costumes, manner of living, and belief in the supernatural world would in themselves prove an interesting narrative, but when coupled with the exciting adventures of Nic Deck, the two Counts, the cowardly Doctor, and the beautiful La Stilla, the story is undoubtedly one of the most enchanting ever offered. This mysterious tale takes place in the area which in just a few years would become known as Dracula's homeland. Jules Verne has the knack of it. He knows how to make the scientifically romantic story. You might not know what a "nyctalop" was, but if you saw one flapping his wings around the dark fortress in the Carpathians, you would run for it, as did Nic Deck. Orfanik is head conjurer, and in his trial he explains how he brought into play for a wicked purpose a variety of ingenious inventions. Includes unique illustrations!

For the Flag

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 42

Jules Verne

"Facing the Flag" is one of the earliest stories dealing with a very modern theme: the development of weapons of mass destruction, and the international community's attempts to reconcile this. Thomas Roch, a celebrated inventor, has supposedly created a weapon so devastating that he demands enormous amounts of money to contract it to the nations of the world. However, his acclamations are not only heard by the sovereign nations; his superweapon is also intently sought after by a villianous mind, striking from his secret island fortress...

The Village in the Treetops

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 48

Jules Verne

Deepest Africa... mysterious lights... an attack by enraged elephants... a lost race of ape-men... and an unknown kingdom ruled by a mystic monarch... An action-packed adventure novel by Jules Verne - the author that foresaw the submarine and the airplane - that takes you deep into the exotic Africa.

Invasion of the Sea

Voyages Extraordinaires: Book 54

Jules Verne

Jules Verne, celebrated French author of Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and Around the World in 80 Days, wrote over 60 novels collected in the popular series "Voyages Extraordinaires." A handful of these have never been translated into English, including Invasion of the Sea, written in 1904 when large-scale canal digging was very much a part of the political, economic, and military strategy of the world's imperial powers.

Instead of linking two seas, as existing canals (the Suez and the Panama) did, Verne proposed a canal that would create a sea in the heart of the Sahara Desert. The story raises a host of concerns -- environmental, cultural, and political. The proposed sea threatens the nomadic way of life of those Islamic tribes living on the site, and they declare war. The ensuing struggle is finally resolved only by a cataclysmic natural event.

This Wesleyan edition features notes, appendices and an introduction by Verne scholar Arthur B. Evans, as well as reproductions of the illustrations from the original French edition.